Governance Archive

  • Users tweeting #WhatWouldMagufuliDo are offering wry ways to emulate Tanzania’s John Magufuli’s clampdown on wasteful spending. #WhatWouldMagufuliDo Tweets

    What would Magufuli do? … to cut costs

    Users tweeting #WhatWouldMagufuliDo are offering wry ways to emulate Tanzania’s John Magufuli’s clampdown on wasteful spending. #WhatWouldMagufuliDo Tweets

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  • Transparency International estimates 75 million Africans paid a bribe in the past year BERLIN, Germany, December 1, 2015 ()TI/APO) – A majority of Africans say corruption has risen in the past 12 months and most governments are seen as failing in their duty to stop the abuse of power, bribery and secret deals, according to a new opinion poll from Transparency International (http://www.Transparency.org). In the report People and Corruption: Africa Survey 2015, part of the Global Corruption Barometer, Transparency International partnered with Afrobarometer, which spoke to 43,143 respondents across 28 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa between March 2014 and September 2015 to ask them about their experiences and perceptions of corruption in their country. The majority (58 per cent) of Africans in the surveyed countries, say corruption has increased over the past 12 months. In 18 out of 28 countries surveyed a large majority of people said their government is doing […]

    Corruption on the rise in Africa poll as governments seen failing to stop it

    Transparency International estimates 75 million Africans paid a bribe in the past year BERLIN, Germany, December 1, 2015 ()TI/APO) – A majority of Africans say corruption has risen in the past 12 months and most governments are seen as failing in their duty to stop the abuse of power, bribery and secret deals, according to a new opinion poll from Transparency International (http://www.Transparency.org). In the report People and Corruption: Africa Survey 2015, part of the Global Corruption Barometer, Transparency International partnered with Afrobarometer, which spoke to 43,143 respondents across 28 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa between March 2014 and September 2015 to ask them about their experiences and perceptions of corruption in their country. The majority (58 per cent) of Africans in the surveyed countries, say corruption has increased over the past 12 months. In 18 out of 28 countries surveyed a large majority of people said their government is doing […]

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  • Mobilising the revenues needed to further development and improve people’s lives will depend on broader tax bases, stronger tax institutions, and redoubled efforts to stem both cross-border and domestic tax evasion and avoidance. In many countries billions of dollars are lost every year to narrow tax bases, weak administrative capacity, and poor tax compliance. Helping countries to strengthen their tax systems and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires a new framework for action. In launching the Addis Tax Initiative, over 30 countries and international organisations have now teamed up to strengthen international cooperation in this area. The Initiative highlights the crucial importance of domestic revenue for financing development and specifically stresses the importance of tackling domestic and cross-border tax evasion and avoidance. Harnessing the momentum of the Financing for Development agenda, the Addis Tax Initiative brings new energy and enthusiasm to the field of domestic resource mobilisation (DRM), emphasizing […]

    Better tax systems crucial for development | ADDIS TAX INITIATIVE starts

    Mobilising the revenues needed to further development and improve people’s lives will depend on broader tax bases, stronger tax institutions, and redoubled efforts to stem both cross-border and domestic tax evasion and avoidance. In many countries billions of dollars are lost every year to narrow tax bases, weak administrative capacity, and poor tax compliance. Helping countries to strengthen their tax systems and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires a new framework for action. In launching the Addis Tax Initiative, over 30 countries and international organisations have now teamed up to strengthen international cooperation in this area. The Initiative highlights the crucial importance of domestic revenue for financing development and specifically stresses the importance of tackling domestic and cross-border tax evasion and avoidance. Harnessing the momentum of the Financing for Development agenda, the Addis Tax Initiative brings new energy and enthusiasm to the field of domestic resource mobilisation (DRM), emphasizing […]

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  • New York (UN) – Volunteers are playing a vital role in making governments worldwide more accountable and responsive to their citizens, but their potential is seriously under-valued, a new report from the United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme says. The State of the World’s Volunteerism Report 2015 is the first global review of evidence around the contribution of volunteers to better governance, a pre-requisite for the success of the new Sustainable Development Goals to be agreed at the United Nations in September. Drawing on evidence from countries as diverse as Brazil, Kenya, Lebanon and Bangladesh, the UN report shows how ordinary people are volunteering their time, energies and skills to improve the way they are governed and engaged at local, national and global levels. Volunteers are working with governments and civil society to hold those in power to account, to influence policies and laws and to represent the voices of those […]

    Volunteers vital to success of new global development agenda, UN report says

    New York (UN) – Volunteers are playing a vital role in making governments worldwide more accountable and responsive to their citizens, but their potential is seriously under-valued, a new report from the United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme says. The State of the World’s Volunteerism Report 2015 is the first global review of evidence around the contribution of volunteers to better governance, a pre-requisite for the success of the new Sustainable Development Goals to be agreed at the United Nations in September. Drawing on evidence from countries as diverse as Brazil, Kenya, Lebanon and Bangladesh, the UN report shows how ordinary people are volunteering their time, energies and skills to improve the way they are governed and engaged at local, national and global levels. Volunteers are working with governments and civil society to hold those in power to account, to influence policies and laws and to represent the voices of those […]

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  • Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Evaluations | DME for Peace. This Guidance is aimed at increasing knowledge on the application of these two approaches in evaluation processes but also at raising awareness on their specific relevance and significance for UN work. It complements the UNEG’s Handbook ‘Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Evaluation: Towards UNEG Guidance’, an abridged version that outlines practical steps on how to prepare, conduct and use HR & GE responsive evaluations. The present document deepends each of these aspects, and provides additional theoretical and applied information, tools and suggestions.

    Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Evaluations | DME for Peace

    Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Evaluations | DME for Peace. This Guidance is aimed at increasing knowledge on the application of these two approaches in evaluation processes but also at raising awareness on their specific relevance and significance for UN work. It complements the UNEG’s Handbook ‘Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Evaluation: Towards UNEG Guidance’, an abridged version that outlines practical steps on how to prepare, conduct and use HR & GE responsive evaluations. The present document deepends each of these aspects, and provides additional theoretical and applied information, tools and suggestions.

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  • “The way that things have always been done” is changing in many African countries   LAGOS, Nigeria, March 13, 2015/ — 57.6% of companies see the development of policies and procedures that can be practically applied in all countries as the most challenging internal anti-corruption and compliance issue. This is one of the topics discussed today at a webcast with Uche Orji, CEO and Managing Director, Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority (NSIA), hosted by Control Risks’ CEO Richard Fenning (https://www.controlrisks.com).   • While FCPA and UKBA still lead anti-bribery and corruption regulation, in a number of African countries the governments feel increasing pressure to join the current trend of stronger enforcement of anti-bribery and corruption regulation in developing countries   • An integrated, global approach to mitigate corruption risk is important, but local adjustment is key   •  “The way that things have always been done” is changing in many African countries and often […]

    More pressure on African governments to have stronger enforcement of anti-bribery and corruption regulation 

    “The way that things have always been done” is changing in many African countries   LAGOS, Nigeria, March 13, 2015/ — 57.6% of companies see the development of policies and procedures that can be practically applied in all countries as the most challenging internal anti-corruption and compliance issue. This is one of the topics discussed today at a webcast with Uche Orji, CEO and Managing Director, Nigerian Sovereign Investment Authority (NSIA), hosted by Control Risks’ CEO Richard Fenning (https://www.controlrisks.com).   • While FCPA and UKBA still lead anti-bribery and corruption regulation, in a number of African countries the governments feel increasing pressure to join the current trend of stronger enforcement of anti-bribery and corruption regulation in developing countries   • An integrated, global approach to mitigate corruption risk is important, but local adjustment is key   •  “The way that things have always been done” is changing in many African countries and often […]

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  • Persistent vulnerability threatens human development, and unless it is systematically tackled by policies and social norms, progress will be neither equitable nor sustainable. This is the core premise of the 2014 Human Development Report. Entitled Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience, the Report provides a fresh perspective on vulnerability and proposes ways to strengthen resilience. The 2014 Human Development Report comes at a critical time, as attention turns to the creation of a new development agenda following the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. According to income-based measures of poverty, 1.2 billion people live with $1.25 or less a day. However, according to the UNDP Multidimensional Poverty Index, almost 1.5 billion people in 91 developing countries are living in poverty with overlapping deprivations in health, education and living standards. And although poverty is declining overall, almost 800 million people are at risk of falling back into […]

    Human Development Report 2014 on vulnerability and resilience warns: 2.2 billion people are poor or near-poor

    Persistent vulnerability threatens human development, and unless it is systematically tackled by policies and social norms, progress will be neither equitable nor sustainable. This is the core premise of the 2014 Human Development Report. Entitled Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience, the Report provides a fresh perspective on vulnerability and proposes ways to strengthen resilience. The 2014 Human Development Report comes at a critical time, as attention turns to the creation of a new development agenda following the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. According to income-based measures of poverty, 1.2 billion people live with $1.25 or less a day. However, according to the UNDP Multidimensional Poverty Index, almost 1.5 billion people in 91 developing countries are living in poverty with overlapping deprivations in health, education and living standards. And although poverty is declining overall, almost 800 million people are at risk of falling back into […]

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  • Learning from one another is the goal of Connective Cities, the new international network of cities for sustainable development. The network started on 24 June in Leipzig. More than half of the world’s population now live in towns and cities, and this is set to increase even further. Combating poverty and tackling environmental and traffic problems represent major challenges for many urban areas. However, they often find particularly innovative solutions, as representatives of municipalities in Germany and abroad demonstrated at the launch of Connective Cities in Leipzig. Connective Cities aims to promote sustainable urban development and give municipalities more opportunities to share their experience of innovative solutions. The network is designed to bring together practitioners from across the globe to implement good ideas on as broad a basis as possible. ‘Change doesn’t happen suddenly; it’s a process,’ Linda Mbonambi from eThekwini Municipality (Durban), South Africa, emphasised. Citizens there can play […]

    Connective Cities: cities for sustainable development

    Learning from one another is the goal of Connective Cities, the new international network of cities for sustainable development. The network started on 24 June in Leipzig. More than half of the world’s population now live in towns and cities, and this is set to increase even further. Combating poverty and tackling environmental and traffic problems represent major challenges for many urban areas. However, they often find particularly innovative solutions, as representatives of municipalities in Germany and abroad demonstrated at the launch of Connective Cities in Leipzig. Connective Cities aims to promote sustainable urban development and give municipalities more opportunities to share their experience of innovative solutions. The network is designed to bring together practitioners from across the globe to implement good ideas on as broad a basis as possible. ‘Change doesn’t happen suddenly; it’s a process,’ Linda Mbonambi from eThekwini Municipality (Durban), South Africa, emphasised. Citizens there can play […]

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  • Karsten Weitzenegger (AGEG Consultants eG) is currently evaluating Social Accountability Pilot Interventions in the Palestinian territories together with his colleague Dr. Nahed R. Eid (Effects for Consultations & Development) in Gaza. The evaluation is part of the Local Governance and Civil Society Development Programme (LGP 3), which is financed by the German BMZ and carried out by GIZ from Ramallah. Concept Social accountability complements formal accountability with citizen-led ac-countability mechanisms. Social accountability is based on four conceptual building blocks: transparency, participation, response, and monitoring; in order for these measures to be effec-tive, they must be implemented as part of a system. Transparency supports pro-cesses that enable access to information in the public domain, including system-atic reporting on operations, budgets, programs, and priorities. Participation refers to a citizen’s right to participate in the decision-making process, including strategic planning, budget formulation, and a complaints system. Response refers to the capacity and willingness […]

    Evaluating Social Accountability Pilot Interventions in the Palestinian territories

    Karsten Weitzenegger (AGEG Consultants eG) is currently evaluating Social Accountability Pilot Interventions in the Palestinian territories together with his colleague Dr. Nahed R. Eid (Effects for Consultations & Development) in Gaza. The evaluation is part of the Local Governance and Civil Society Development Programme (LGP 3), which is financed by the German BMZ and carried out by GIZ from Ramallah. Concept Social accountability complements formal accountability with citizen-led ac-countability mechanisms. Social accountability is based on four conceptual building blocks: transparency, participation, response, and monitoring; in order for these measures to be effec-tive, they must be implemented as part of a system. Transparency supports pro-cesses that enable access to information in the public domain, including system-atic reporting on operations, budgets, programs, and priorities. Participation refers to a citizen’s right to participate in the decision-making process, including strategic planning, budget formulation, and a complaints system. Response refers to the capacity and willingness […]

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  • Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are now widely used in development economics. However, their use is often resisted by non-governmental development organizations. The objections they raise differ between the three types of activities of such non-governmental organizations (NGOs): capacity building, advocacy, and service delivery. This paper discusses the objections and alternatives to RCTs for each type. RCTs might not be appropriate even for service delivery, the activity which would appear to be best suited to their use. This is because typically local NGO staff can use their discretion in selecting communities or individuals for participation in a service-delivery programme. A standard RCT does not mimic the use of private knowledge of local circumstances and can therefore be misleading. Chris Elbers and Jan Willem Gunning WIDER Working Paper 2014/026 via UNU-WIDER : WP/2014/026 Evaluation of non-governmental development organizations.

    Evaluation of non-governmental development organizations | UNU-WIDER WP/2014/026

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are now widely used in development economics. However, their use is often resisted by non-governmental development organizations. The objections they raise differ between the three types of activities of such non-governmental organizations (NGOs): capacity building, advocacy, and service delivery. This paper discusses the objections and alternatives to RCTs for each type. RCTs might not be appropriate even for service delivery, the activity which would appear to be best suited to their use. This is because typically local NGO staff can use their discretion in selecting communities or individuals for participation in a service-delivery programme. A standard RCT does not mimic the use of private knowledge of local circumstances and can therefore be misleading. Chris Elbers and Jan Willem Gunning WIDER Working Paper 2014/026 via UNU-WIDER : WP/2014/026 Evaluation of non-governmental development organizations.

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  • 12 recommendations on government reform | Development that Works. This Inter-American Development Bank paper proposes three principles and twelve recommendations: The three principles are: Government capabilities are the outcome over time of endogenous choices by key political actors, as part of a country’s own political equilibrium. Neither institutions, nor governmental capabilities, can be built by fiat, for instance by copying a “best practice” law from another country. Cooperation over time and across administrations is necessary. And the twelve recommendations: Invest in capabilities, not in “buying them computers”. Incentives trump rules: avoid a copy/paste mentality. Focus on “safe bets” reforms. Try to be consistent over time. Try not to be an accomplice of capacity destruction. Foster consensus. Act as enforcement and commitment technology of political agreements against the short-term temptations of actors. Bring on more board players. Accept middle-of-the-ground solutions. Be aware of strategic timing issues. Steer away from the technocratic […]

    12 recommendations on government reform | Development that Works

    12 recommendations on government reform | Development that Works. This Inter-American Development Bank paper proposes three principles and twelve recommendations: The three principles are: Government capabilities are the outcome over time of endogenous choices by key political actors, as part of a country’s own political equilibrium. Neither institutions, nor governmental capabilities, can be built by fiat, for instance by copying a “best practice” law from another country. Cooperation over time and across administrations is necessary. And the twelve recommendations: Invest in capabilities, not in “buying them computers”. Incentives trump rules: avoid a copy/paste mentality. Focus on “safe bets” reforms. Try to be consistent over time. Try not to be an accomplice of capacity destruction. Foster consensus. Act as enforcement and commitment technology of political agreements against the short-term temptations of actors. Bring on more board players. Accept middle-of-the-ground solutions. Be aware of strategic timing issues. Steer away from the technocratic […]

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  • In recent years, randomized controlled trials have become increasingly popular in the social sciences. In development economics in particular, their use has attracted considerable debate in relation to the identification of ‘what works’ in development policy. This paper focuses on a core topic in development policy: governance. It aims to address two key questions: (1) ‘what have the main contributions of randomized controlled trials been to the study of governance?’ and (2) ‘what could be the contributions, and relatedly the limits of such methods?’. To address these questions, a systematic review of experimental and quasi-experimental methods to study government performance was conducted. It identified 139 relevant papers grouped into three major types of policy interventions that aim to: (1) improve supply-side capabilities of governments; (2) change individual behaviour through various devices, notably incentives, and (3) improve informational asymmetries. We find that randomized controlled trials can be useful in studying the […]

    What can experiments tell us about how to improve governance? UNU WIDER Paper

    In recent years, randomized controlled trials have become increasingly popular in the social sciences. In development economics in particular, their use has attracted considerable debate in relation to the identification of ‘what works’ in development policy. This paper focuses on a core topic in development policy: governance. It aims to address two key questions: (1) ‘what have the main contributions of randomized controlled trials been to the study of governance?’ and (2) ‘what could be the contributions, and relatedly the limits of such methods?’. To address these questions, a systematic review of experimental and quasi-experimental methods to study government performance was conducted. It identified 139 relevant papers grouped into three major types of policy interventions that aim to: (1) improve supply-side capabilities of governments; (2) change individual behaviour through various devices, notably incentives, and (3) improve informational asymmetries. We find that randomized controlled trials can be useful in studying the […]

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