Poverty Archive

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Weitzenegger joins SEEDwork Sustainable Economic Development and Employment

Karsten Weitzenegger is an Associate of SEEDwork, the expert association for sustainable economic development and employment. Please visit my profile at http://www.seedwork.net/profile/karsten-weitzenegger SEEDwork is a registered non-profit association composed of professionals with long-standing experience in technical and financial development cooperation. The purpose of the association is the promotion of societal and economic development in developing and threshold countries. SEEDwork focuses on sustainable growth, decent work, and the promotion of international cooperation in this regard. “Growth – Income – Social Inclusion” We promote economic development and employment in a range of different areas. In many cases, reforms in the financial sector are necessary to establish transparency for investors or to provide individuals and micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) with funding. This may especially apply to micro-credits for the small entities. Therefore, we link existing and would-be entrepreneurs to financing institutions. Regarding sustainable business development we use value chain analyses as […]

seedwork_logo1Karsten Weitzenegger is an Associate of SEEDwork, the expert association for sustainable economic development and employment. Please visit my profile at http://www.seedwork.net/profile/karsten-weitzenegger

SEEDwork is a registered non-profit association composed of professionals with long-standing experience in technical and financial development cooperation. The purpose of the association is the promotion of societal and economic development in developing and threshold countries. SEEDwork focuses on sustainable growth, decent work, and the promotion of international cooperation in this regard.

“Growth – Income – Social Inclusion”

We promote economic development and employment in a range of different areas. In many cases, reforms in the financial sector are necessary to establish transparency for investors or to provide individuals and micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) with funding. This may especially apply to micro-credits for the small entities. Therefore, we link existing and would-be entrepreneurs to financing institutions.

Regarding sustainable business development we use value chain analyses as a starting point to develop action plans for the MSMEs involved, and we accompany their implementation. With all our activities we particularly cater for the special needs of different target groups like for example the qualification of young people to increase their employability or their chances to become self-employed, e.g. in the green sector.

In addition, we involve members of the Diaspora who wish to contribute to the economic development of their countries of origin be it through own investments or the extension/linkage of their existing businesses in their new home-countries with their country of origin. We incorporate professional bodies like chambers and associations in our work to enable companies to learn from each other and to improve their business performance.

servseed

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Fair Trade = no poverty! WFTO promotes 10 Principles of Fair Trade #FairTradeBreaksPoverty

Culemborg, 26 September 2016 – This year WFTO observes Global Anti-Poverty Week (16-22 October 2016) by promoting the 10 Principles of Fair Trade as means to eradicate poverty as desired by the first goal of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals – NO POVERTY. WFTO believes that the principles of Fair Trade are effective overarching tools to fight poverty. Using the concept of ‘Agent for Change’ (Fair Trade as an agent for change), WFTO’s formula to eradicate poverty: Fair Trade + Economic Opportunities = No Poverty Fair Trade is a tangible contribution to the fight against poverty, climate change and global economic crises. The World Bank reports that more than one billion people still live at or below $1.25 a day.1 The World Fair Trade Organization (WFTO) believes that trade must benefit the most vulnerable and deliver sustainable livelihoods by developing opportunities especially for small and disadvantaged producers. Recurring global economic […]

Culemborg, 26 September 2016 – This year WFTO observes Global Anti-Poverty Week (16-22 October 2016) by promoting the 10 Principles of Fair Trade as means to eradicate poverty as desired by the first goal of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals – NO POVERTY.

WFTO believes that the principles of Fair Trade are effective overarching tools to fight poverty.
Using the concept of ‘Agent for Change’ (Fair Trade as an agent for change), WFTO’s formula to eradicate poverty: Fair Trade + Economic Opportunities = No Poverty

Fair Trade is a tangible contribution to the fight against poverty, climate change and global economic crises. The World Bank reports that more than one billion people still live at or below $1.25 a day.1 The World Fair Trade Organization (WFTO) believes that trade must benefit the most vulnerable and deliver sustainable livelihoods by developing opportunities especially for small and disadvantaged producers. Recurring global economic crises and persistent poverty in many countries confirm the demand for a fair and sustainable economy locally and globally.

The World Fair Trade Organization (WFTO) is a global network of organisations representing the Fair Trade supply chain. Membership in WFTO provides Fair Trade organisations with credibility and identity by way of an international guarantee system, a place of learning where members connect with like-minded people from around the world, tools and training to increase market access, and a common voice that speaks out for Fair Trade and trade justice – and is heard.

WFTO prescribes 10 Principles that Fair Trade Organisations must follow in their day-to-day work and carries out monitoring to ensure these principles are upheld.

10 FT Principles

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Cash Transfer Programs Succeed for Zambia’s Poor, Offer Lessons for Battling African Poverty, AIR Finds

African nations increasingly embrace cash transfers to combat the continent’s cycle of poverty WASHINGTON D.C., United States of America, June 8, 2016/ — Programs designed to alleviate hunger and increase food supply through cash transfers to some of Zambia’s poorest families achieved those goals and more, final evaluations conducted by the American Institutes for Research (AIR) (http://www.AIR.org) revealed. Overall, researchers found that a cash-transfer program geared toward families with at least one young child had effects that amounted to a net benefit of 1.5 kwacha—Zambia’s currency— for each kwacha transferred. A second program for households with fewer able-bodied people to farm had effects that amounted to a net benefit of 1.68 kwacha for each kwacha transferred. Besides eating more meals and building more reliable food reserves, families used the money to improve their housing, buy additional necessities for their children, acquire more livestock and reduce debt. The studies, commissioned by […]
African nations increasingly embrace cash transfers to combat the continent’s cycle of poverty
WASHINGTON D.C., United States of America, June 8, 2016/ — Programs designed to alleviate hunger and increase food supply through cash transfers to some of Zambia’s poorest families achieved those goals and more, final evaluations conducted by the American Institutes for Research (AIR) (http://www.AIR.org) revealed.

Overall, researchers found that a cash-transfer program geared toward families with at least one young child had effects that amounted to a net benefit of 1.5 kwacha—Zambia’s currency— for each kwacha transferred. A second program for households with fewer able-bodied people to farm had effects that amounted to a net benefit of 1.68 kwacha for each kwacha transferred.

Besides eating more meals and building more reliable food reserves, families used the money to improve their housing, buy additional necessities for their children, acquire more livestock and reduce debt.

The studies, commissioned by UNICEF, are likely to be closely watched as African nations increasingly embrace cash transfers to combat the continent’s cycle of poverty. South Africa’s program is the largest, with roughly 16.1 million people—about a third of its population—receiving some kind of social grant.

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Notably, the two Zambian programs were unconditional—providing small, consistent sums of money with no strings attached on how they were spent. The programs bucked general criticisms that cash transfers spark dependency. Rather, the discretionary approach empowered families, who used the grants to improve their living standards in ways that made sense given their individual circumstances. At no point during the multiyear grants did alcohol consumption increase. Nor was there any impact on fertility, according to the evaluations.

“The unconditional approach worked,” said Stanfield Michelo, director of social welfare at Zambia’s Ministry of Community Development and Social Welfare. “And because it did, the region is making positive strides. Without a doubt, the changes would not have been possible without AIR’s rigorous evaluations.”

The evaluation of the Child Grant cash-transfer program (CGP) lasted four years, and the evaluation of the Multiple Category Targeting Grant (MCTG) lasted three years. Begun in 2010 in three of Zambia’s poorest districts, the CGP was open to all households with at least one child under age 4. Half were randomly assigned to receive cash transfers of 60 kwacha ($12) a month, and half to a control group that did not receive funds. The MCTG was aimed at poor households with fewer able-bodied people to farm, due largely to a “missing generation” of parents in their 30s and 40s and disproportionally high numbers of adolescents and orphans cared for by widows and grandparents. As with the CGP, half the MCTG participants received the equivalent of $12 a month and half were in a control group that didn’t.

The studies were notable not only for their duration, but also for their use of randomization and control groups to tease out the program’s true effects.

“Few evaluations of cash transfer programs can make such strong causal claims with as much certainty as these two evaluations,” said David Seidenfeld (http://www.air.org/person/david-seidenfeld), AIR’s senior director of international research and evaluation and lead study author. “The design of the study, which extended over several years, allowed us to see that the beneficiaries do not grow complacent over time, but instead find ways to grow the value of the transfer beyond benefits related to food security and consumption.”

Although the studies revealed persistent successes, they also offered future researchers and policymakers an idea of cash transfers’ limitations. The studies did not show consistent successes in education or child nutrition, possibly due to large-scale infrastructure issues—namely, the supply of social services, access to clean water, and a lack of health care and education facilities.

Among the studies’ principal lessons, researchers found that the degree of positive impact depended largely on the participants’ characteristics. For example, the multiple-category grants had large impacts on schooling because participating households had more school-age children. Overall, school enrollment jumps of 8 percent for children ages 11–14 and 11 percent for children 15–17 were attributed to the program, and these age groups are at the greatest risk of dropping out in Zambia, according to the report. By contrast, four years into the program, the child grants had no enrollment or attendance impacts for children in three groups: ages 4–7, 8–10 and 15–17.

“Another lesson is that the unconditional nature of the grants gave participants the flexibility to use the money to combat principal life challenges,” said UNICEF Zambia Representative Hamid El-Bashir Ibrahim. “For example, the CGP significantly affected many indicators commonly associated with resiliency—the ability to manage and withstand shocks. Households with transfers significantly improved housing quality and tools, livestock procurement, and opportunities to diversify income-generating activities so they could better withstand emergencies.”

“The overall results demonstrate unequivocally that common perceptions about cash transfers—that they are handouts and cause dependency, or lead to alcohol and tobacco consumption, or increases in pregnancy—are not true in Zambia,” Seidenfeld said. “Quite the contrary. Due to the unconditional nature of the grants, households had the flexibility needed to meet their most pressing challenges head on.”

The final reports on the Child Grant cash transfer program (http://bit.ly/25KDdJk) and the Multiple Category Transfer Grant program (http://bit.ly/1Udb21M) can be found on AIR’s website. The site also features a video (http://bit.ly/1TXR5Oe) of David Seidenfeld discussing lessons learned from the multiyear studies.

Source: APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of American Institutes for Research (AIR).

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Economic inequality has reached extreme levels – Oxfam reports

Around the world, the gap between the rich and poor is spiralling out of control. Extreme inequality is not accidental or inevitable – it’s the result of deliberate policy choices by people in power. Together we must even it up and stop inequality from undermining our fight against poverty. Join Oxfam’s campaign now to close the gap between the rich and the rest. Copyright: Oxfam From Ghana to Germany, Italy to Indonesia, the gap between rich and poor is widening. In 2013, seven out of 10 people lived in countries where economic inequality was worse than 30 years ago, and in 2014 Oxfam calculated that just 85 people owned as much wealth as the poorest half of humanity. Extreme inequality corrupts politics and hinders economic growth. It exacerbates gender inequality, and causes a range of health and social problems. It stifles social mobility, keeping some families poor for generations, while […]

Around the world, the gap between the rich and poor is spiralling out of control. Extreme inequality is not accidental or inevitable – it’s the result of deliberate policy choices by people in power. Together we must even it up and stop inequality from undermining our fight against poverty. Join Oxfam’s campaign now to close the gap between the rich and the rest.


Copyright: Oxfam

From Ghana to Germany, Italy to Indonesia, the gap between rich and poor is widening. In 2013, seven out of 10 people lived in countries where economic inequality was worse than 30 years ago, and in 2014 Oxfam calculated that just 85 people owned as much wealth as the poorest half of humanity.

Extreme inequality corrupts politics and hinders economic growth.

It exacerbates gender inequality, and causes a range of health and social problems. It stifles social mobility, keeping some families poor for generations, while others enjoy year after year of privilege. It fuels crime and even violent conflict. These corrosive consequences affect us all, but the impact is worst for the poorest people.

In Even it Up: Time to End Extreme Inequality Oxfam presents new evidence that the gap between rich and poor is growing ever wider and is undermining poverty eradication.

If India stopped inequality from rising, 90 million more men and women could be lifted out of extreme poverty by 2019.

This report delves into the causes of the inequality crisis and looks at the concrete solutions that can overcome it. Drawing on case studies from around the world the report demonstrates the impact that rising inequality is having on rich and poor countries alike and explores the different ways that people and governments are responding to it.

The world has woken up to the gap between the rich and rest and are already demanding a world that is fairer. This report supports a new campaign to join this growing movement to end extreme inequality and Even it up.

“The extreme inequalities in incomes and assets we see in much of the world today harms our economies, our societies, and undermines our politics. Whilst we should all worry about this it is of course the poorest who suffer most, experiencing not just vastly unequal outcomes in their lives, but vastly unequal opportunities too. Oxfam’s report is a timely reminder that any real effort to end poverty has to confront the public policy choices that create and sustain inequality.”
Professor Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University, winner of Nobel Prize for Economics

Downloads

Even It Up: Time to end extreme inequality PDF 2.92 MB
Even It Up: Time to end extreme inequality (summary) PDF 540.08 KB
Even It Up: Time to end extreme inequality (endorsements) PDF 96.67 KB
Equilibre o Jogo! É hora de acabar com a desigualdade extrema (sumário executivo em português) PDF 576.99 KB

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Wikiprogress is the Platform on Measuring the Progress of Societies

Karsten Weitzenegger Consulting uses Wikiprogress, This is a global platform for you to gather, share and create information about measuring the progress of society. www.wikiprogress.org Wikiprogress is a global platform for sharing information in order to evaluate social, environmental and economic progress. It is open to all members and communities for contribution – students and researchers, civil society organisations, governmental and intergovernmental organisations, multilateral institutions, businesses, statistical offices, community organisations and individuals – to anyone who has an interest in the concept of “progress”. Wikiprogress was launched in 2009 at the OECD World Forum on Statistics, Knowledge and Policy in Busan, Korea. Explore Categories Child Well-being Wikiprogress America Latina Governance and Civic Engagement Networks and Partners Society and Culture Countries Health Online Consultations Subjective Well-being Data and Statistics Housing Personal Security Sustainable Development Education and Skills Human Well-being Post-2015 Transport and Access to Services Environment Income and Wealth Progress Initiatives […]

Karsten Weitzenegger Consulting uses Wikiprogress, This is a global platform for you to gather, share and create information about measuring the progress of society. www.wikiprogress.org

Wikiprogress is a global platform for sharing information in order to evaluate social, environmental and economic progress. It is open to all members and communities for contribution – students and researchers, civil society organisations, governmental and intergovernmental organisations, multilateral institutions, businesses, statistical offices, community organisations and individuals – to anyone who has an interest in the concept of “progress”. Wikiprogress was launched in 2009 at the OECD World Forum on Statistics, Knowledge and Policy in Busan, Korea.

Explore Categories

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Human Development Report 2014 on vulnerability and resilience warns: 2.2 billion people are poor or near-poor

Persistent vulnerability threatens human development, and unless it is systematically tackled by policies and social norms, progress will be neither equitable nor sustainable. This is the core premise of the 2014 Human Development Report. Entitled Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience, the Report provides a fresh perspective on vulnerability and proposes ways to strengthen resilience. The 2014 Human Development Report comes at a critical time, as attention turns to the creation of a new development agenda following the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. According to income-based measures of poverty, 1.2 billion people live with $1.25 or less a day. However, according to the UNDP Multidimensional Poverty Index, almost 1.5 billion people in 91 developing countries are living in poverty with overlapping deprivations in health, education and living standards. And although poverty is declining overall, almost 800 million people are at risk of falling back into […]

Persistent vulnerability threatens human development, and unless it is systematically tackled by policies and social norms, progress will be neither equitable nor sustainable. This is the core premise of the 2014 Human Development Report. Entitled Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience, the Report provides a fresh perspective on vulnerability and proposes ways to strengthen resilience.

The 2014 Human Development Report comes at a critical time, as attention turns to the creation of a new development agenda following the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

According to income-based measures of poverty, 1.2 billion people live with $1.25 or less a day. However, according to the UNDP Multidimensional Poverty Index, almost 1.5 billion people in 91 developing countries are living in poverty with overlapping deprivations in health, education and living standards. And although poverty is declining overall, almost 800 million people are at risk of falling back into poverty if setbacks occur. Many people face either structural or life-cycle vulnerabilities.

“By addressing vulnerabilities, all people may share in development progress, and human development will become increasingly equitable and sustainable,” stated UNDP Administrator Helen Clark when launching th HDR in Tokyo on 24. July 2014.

Zeroing in on what holds back progress

The Report holds that as crises spread ever faster and further, it is critical to understand vulnerability in order to secure gains and sustain progress.

It points to a slowdown in human development growth across all regions, as measured by the Human Development Index (HDI). It notes that threats such as financial crises, fluctuations in food prices, natural disasters and violent conflict significantly impede progress.

“Reducing both poverty and people’s vulnerability to falling into poverty must be a central objective of the post-2015 agenda,” the Report states. “Eliminating extreme poverty is not just about ‘getting to zero’; it is also about staying there.”

A human development lens on who is vulnerable and why

“Reducing vulnerability is a key ingredient in any agenda for improving human development,” writes Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz, in a contribution to the Report. “[We] need to approach it from a broad systemic perspective.”

The 2014 Report takes such an approach, using a human development lens to take a fresh look at vulnerability as an overlapping and mutually reinforcing set of risks.

It explores structural vulnerabilities – those that have persisted and compounded over time as a result of discrimination and institutional failings, hurting groups such as the poor, women, migrants, people living with disabilities, indigenous groups and older people. For instance, 80 percent of the world’s elderly lack social protection, with large numbers of older people also poor and disabled.

The Report also introduces the idea of life cycle vulnerabilities, the sensitive points in life where shocks can have greater impact. They include the first 1,000 days of life, and the transitions from school to work, and from work to retirement.

“Capabilities accumulate over an individual’s lifetime and have to be nurtured and maintained; otherwise they can stagnate and even decline,” it warns. “Life capabilities are affected by investments made in preceding stages of life, and there can be long-term consequences of exposure to short-term shocks.”

For example, in one study cited by the Report, poor children in Ecuador were shown to be already at a vocabulary disadvantage by the age of six.

Timely interventions—such as investments in early childhood development—are therefore critical, the Report states.

Poor countries can afford universal provision of basic social services

The Report advocates for the universal provision of basic social services to enhance resilience, refuting the notion that only wealthy countries can afford to do this. It presents a comparative analysis of countries of differing income levels and systems of government that have either started to implement or have fully implemented such policies.

Those countries include not only the usual suspects such as Denmark, Norway and Sweden, but also fast-growing economies such as Republic of Korea and developing countries such as Costa Rica.
“These countries started putting in place measures of social insurance when their Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita was lower than India’s and Pakistan’s now,” the Report observes.

However, “there may be instances in which equal opportunities require unequal treatment,” notes Khalid Malik, Director of UNDP’s Human Development Report Office. “Greater resources and services may need to be provided to the poor, the excluded and the marginalized to enhance everyone’s capabilities and life choices.”

Putting full employment back atop the global policy agenda

The Report calls for governments to recommit to the objective of full employment, a mainstay of macroeconomic policies of the 1950s and 1960s that was overtaken by competing policy goals following the oil shocks of the 1970s.

It argues that full employment yields social dividends that surpass private benefits, such as fostering social stability and cohesion.

Acknowledging the challenges that developing countries face with respect to full employment, it urges a focus on structural transformation “so that modern formal employment gradually incorporates most of the workforce,” including a transition from agriculture into industry and services, with supporting investments in infrastructure and education.

Social protection is feasible at early stages of development

The majority of the world’s population lacks comprehensive social protections such as pensions and unemployment insurance. The Report argues that such measures are achievable by countries at all stages of development.

“Providing basic social security benefits to the world’s poor would cost less than 2 percent of global GDP,” it asserts. It cites estimates of the cost of providing a basic social protection floor—including universal basic old age and disability pensions, basic childcare benefits, universal access to essential health care, social assistance and a 100-day employment scheme—for 12 low-income African and Asian countries, ranging from about 10 percent of GDP in Burkina Faso to less than 4 percent of GDP in India.

“A basic social protection package is affordable so long as low-income countries reallocate funds and raise domestic resources, coupled with support by the international donor community,” it states.

Collective effort, coordinated action needed at global level

The Report also calls for stronger collective action, as well as better global coordination and commitment to shoring up resilience, in response to vulnerabilities that are increasingly global in origin and impact.

Threats ranging from financial crises to climate change to conflicts are trans-national in nature, but the effects are experienced locally and nationally and often overlap. Take the case of Niger, which has faced severe food and nutrition crises brought on by a series of droughts. At the same time, Niger had to cope with an influx of refugees fleeing conflict in neighbouring Mali.
Trans-national threats cannot be resolved by individual nations acting independently; they require a new focus from the international community that goes beyond short-term responses like humanitarian assistance, the Report argues.

To increase support for national programmes and open up policy space for nations to adapt universalism to specific country conditions, the Report calls for “an international consensus on universal social protection” to be included in the post-2015 agenda.

About this Report

The 2014 Human Development Report – Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience provides a fresh perspective on vulnerability and proposes ways to strengthen resilience.

The Human Development Report is an editorially independent publication of the United Nations Development Programme. For free downloads of the 2014 Human Development Report, plus additional reference materials on its indices and specific regional implications, please visit: http://hdr.undp.org

Download the Report http://hdr.undp.org/2014-report/download

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From Poverty to Power » Are we measuring the right things?

Duncan Green started a discussion on the latest multidimensional poverty index in his Blog:

From Poverty to Power » Are we measuring the right things? The latest multidimensional poverty index is launched today – what do you think?.

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DCED Global Seminar on Results Measurement 24-26 March 2014, Bangkok

Following popular demand, the The Donor Committee for Enterprise Development DCED is organising the second Global Seminar on results measurement in the field of private sector development (PSD), 24-26 March 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Seminar is being organised in cooperation with the ILO and with financial support from the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO). It will have a similar format to the DCED Global Seminar in 2012, which was attended by 100 participants from 54 different organisations, field programmes and governments.

You are invited to join the Seminar as a participant. Download the registration form here, and send to Admin@Enterprise-Development.org. There is a fee of $600 for those accepted for participation, and all participants must pay their own travel, accommodation and insurance costs. Early registration is advised. More: http://www.enterprise-development.org/page/seminar2014

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Responsible Development in a Polycentric World: Inequality, Citizenship and the Middle Classes #ResponsibleDev| EADI General Conference, 23 – 26 June 2014, Bonn, Germany

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As a member of the European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), I’m registered for the 14th EADI General Conference, 23 – 26 June 2014, in Bonn, Germany and will tweet using #ResponsibleDev

The EADI General Conference is a major European event devoted to a topical theme which attracts more than 400 researchers active in development research and global change issues. It is a European forum for academic exchange, reflection and debate.

The four-day conference offers a wide range of Working Group Sessions and Panels organised by various international institutes. In addition to the Dudley-Seers-Lecture which will mark the official opening of the conference, each day a plenary lecture with a different thematic focus will provide valuable insights into cutting-edge development research.

Researchers on development issues are invited to present papers for the EADI General Conference under the Working Group sessions. Call for Papers: http://www.gc2014.org/call-for-papers/

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International Youth Day: See some inspirational young people moving development forward

To celebrate International Youth Day on 12 August 2013, we’re shining a spotlight on just some of the young people who are refusing to inherit a world where extreme poverty and inequality exist.

I hear so many people dismiss the issue of global poverty with the words ‘It’s just how the world is. There will always be poverty, you’re wasting your time trying to change anything’. I wonder if they thought the same way when they were 15?

Before we become jaded and cynical, before the daily newsreel of human suffering becomes background noise, most of us believe changing the world is possible. Guess what? It is.

Sometimes it comes quickly in revolutions, but more often it creeps up on us slowly so we almost don’t notice. We’ve halved extreme global poverty in the last 20 years. HALVED. And with continued momentum we could finish the job by 2030.

One thing I’m sure of is we’re going to need young people like these to make it happen. Prepare to be inspired.

Moti was born in the slums of Kathmandu and became an ActionAid sponsored child at the age of 11. He is now a member of ActionAid’s global youth network, Activista.

UK video blogger Charlie McDonnell aka Charlieissocoollike travelled to Tanzania with the Enough Food for Everyone IF coalition, where he met 15 year old Frank who overcame malnutrition to become a hunger activist.

Young photographers from poor communities in South Africa are documenting the poverty and inequality around them, exhibiting the photos and driving the call for change.

A new generation of Kenyans are developing new mindsets, embracing new technologies and innovating solutions to social problems in the country, influencing the government at the same time.

Malala Yousefzai spent her 16th birthday addressing the UN with a demand for universal access to education. She was shot in the head by the Taliban less than a year ago for campaigning in Pakistan for girls* education rights.

Modjadji was the first girl in her South African village to go to university, thanks to a government bursary which is giving students from poor communities opportunities they could only ever dream of before.

We’re not all young, but we believe it can be done.