Publications Archive

  • Millions of people are not benefiting from progress, with the gap set to widen unless deep-rooted development barriers, including discrimination and unequal political participation, are tackled. These are the findings of the Human Development Report 2016, entitled ‘Human Development for Everyone’, released today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Stockholm, 21 March 2017 (UNDP) A quarter-century of impressive human development progress continues to leave many people behind, with systemic, often unmeasured, barriers to catching up. A stronger focus on those excluded and on actions to dismantle these barriers is urgently needed to ensure sustainable human development for all. In past decades, there has been significant gains in human development levels in almost every country; but millions of people have not benefited from this progress. Who has been left behind and why? The Human Development Report 2016 ’Human Development for Everyone’ looks into these two questions. It identifies recognizes that […]

    World’s most marginalized still left behind by global development priorities

    Millions of people are not benefiting from progress, with the gap set to widen unless deep-rooted development barriers, including discrimination and unequal political participation, are tackled. These are the findings of the Human Development Report 2016, entitled ‘Human Development for Everyone’, released today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Stockholm, 21 March 2017 (UNDP) A quarter-century of impressive human development progress continues to leave many people behind, with systemic, often unmeasured, barriers to catching up. A stronger focus on those excluded and on actions to dismantle these barriers is urgently needed to ensure sustainable human development for all. In past decades, there has been significant gains in human development levels in almost every country; but millions of people have not benefited from this progress. Who has been left behind and why? The Human Development Report 2016 ’Human Development for Everyone’ looks into these two questions. It identifies recognizes that […]

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  • The World Trade Organisation (WTO) has released a new study focusing on SMEs’ lack of access to trade finance, providing a list of recommendations to address the gap. WTO Director-General Roberto Azevêdo has issued a call for action to help close the gaps in the availability of trade finance that affect the trade prospects of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), particularly in Africa and Asia. In a new WTO publication, “Trade Finance and SMEs: bridging the gaps in provision”, which examines the problem and looks into possible solutions, DG Azevêdo says that easing the supply of credit could have a big impact in helping small businesses grow and in supporting the development of the poorest countries. The WTO’s strategy focuses on three fronts: firstly, encouraging global financial institutions to stay engaged, ensuring that regulations are not prohibitive; then, enhancing local financial institutions’ capacity to supply trade finance to SMEs; finally, […]

    Trade finance and SMEs – Bridging the gaps in provision

    The World Trade Organisation (WTO) has released a new study focusing on SMEs’ lack of access to trade finance, providing a list of recommendations to address the gap. WTO Director-General Roberto Azevêdo has issued a call for action to help close the gaps in the availability of trade finance that affect the trade prospects of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), particularly in Africa and Asia. In a new WTO publication, “Trade Finance and SMEs: bridging the gaps in provision”, which examines the problem and looks into possible solutions, DG Azevêdo says that easing the supply of credit could have a big impact in helping small businesses grow and in supporting the development of the poorest countries. The WTO’s strategy focuses on three fronts: firstly, encouraging global financial institutions to stay engaged, ensuring that regulations are not prohibitive; then, enhancing local financial institutions’ capacity to supply trade finance to SMEs; finally, […]

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  • Making Partnerships Effective Coalitions for Action With the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, the question of how to finance, implement and monitor these goals moves to the centre of the debate. Today, international development co-operation takes place in an increasingly complex environment, with an ever growing number of actors, policies and instruments involved. This complexity raises the stakes for achieving the goals, but also opens up new opportunities. Although governments will remain the key actors in the implementation of the new post-2015 goals, the role of non-state actors such as civil society, foundations and business is growing. Their association through effective partnerships will be key to the implementation of the post-2015 agenda. The Development Co-operation Report 2015 explores the potential of networks and partnerships to create incentives for responsible action, as well as innovative, fit-for-purpose ways of co-ordinating the activities of diverse stakeholders. The report – Making Partnerships Effective […]

    OECD Development Co-operation Report 2015

    Making Partnerships Effective Coalitions for Action With the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, the question of how to finance, implement and monitor these goals moves to the centre of the debate. Today, international development co-operation takes place in an increasingly complex environment, with an ever growing number of actors, policies and instruments involved. This complexity raises the stakes for achieving the goals, but also opens up new opportunities. Although governments will remain the key actors in the implementation of the new post-2015 goals, the role of non-state actors such as civil society, foundations and business is growing. Their association through effective partnerships will be key to the implementation of the post-2015 agenda. The Development Co-operation Report 2015 explores the potential of networks and partnerships to create incentives for responsible action, as well as innovative, fit-for-purpose ways of co-ordinating the activities of diverse stakeholders. The report – Making Partnerships Effective […]

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  • Twitter chat hosted by ODI What kind of photo provokes people to donate money to aid agencies – and how do agencies ensure that images preserve their subjects’ dignity? What kinds of constraints influence the photos we choose? And has social media created new opportunities for self-representation, or just reinforced the use of outdated visual clichés? Join photographers, donors, researchers, critics and NGO sector communications professionals to discuss these issues, highlight great (and not so great) examples of development photography, and share best practice. View a Twitter list of the participants. Follow #DevPix on Twitter for live coverage #DevPix Tweets

    Dos and Don’ts of Development Photography #DevPix

    Twitter chat hosted by ODI What kind of photo provokes people to donate money to aid agencies – and how do agencies ensure that images preserve their subjects’ dignity? What kinds of constraints influence the photos we choose? And has social media created new opportunities for self-representation, or just reinforced the use of outdated visual clichés? Join photographers, donors, researchers, critics and NGO sector communications professionals to discuss these issues, highlight great (and not so great) examples of development photography, and share best practice. View a Twitter list of the participants. Follow #DevPix on Twitter for live coverage #DevPix Tweets

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  • New York (UN) – Volunteers are playing a vital role in making governments worldwide more accountable and responsive to their citizens, but their potential is seriously under-valued, a new report from the United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme says. The State of the World’s Volunteerism Report 2015 is the first global review of evidence around the contribution of volunteers to better governance, a pre-requisite for the success of the new Sustainable Development Goals to be agreed at the United Nations in September. Drawing on evidence from countries as diverse as Brazil, Kenya, Lebanon and Bangladesh, the UN report shows how ordinary people are volunteering their time, energies and skills to improve the way they are governed and engaged at local, national and global levels. Volunteers are working with governments and civil society to hold those in power to account, to influence policies and laws and to represent the voices of those […]

    Volunteers vital to success of new global development agenda, UN report says

    New York (UN) – Volunteers are playing a vital role in making governments worldwide more accountable and responsive to their citizens, but their potential is seriously under-valued, a new report from the United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme says. The State of the World’s Volunteerism Report 2015 is the first global review of evidence around the contribution of volunteers to better governance, a pre-requisite for the success of the new Sustainable Development Goals to be agreed at the United Nations in September. Drawing on evidence from countries as diverse as Brazil, Kenya, Lebanon and Bangladesh, the UN report shows how ordinary people are volunteering their time, energies and skills to improve the way they are governed and engaged at local, national and global levels. Volunteers are working with governments and civil society to hold those in power to account, to influence policies and laws and to represent the voices of those […]

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  • Paris 08/04/2015 (OECD) Development aid flows were stable in 2014, after hitting an all-time high in 2013, but aid to the poorest countries continued to fall, according to official data collected by the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). Net official development assistance (ODA) from DAC members totalled USD 135.2 billion, level with a record USD 135.1 billion in 2013, though marking a 0.5% decline in real terms. Net ODA as a share of gross national income was 0.29%, also on a par with 2013. ODA has increased by 66% in real terms since 2000, when the Millennium Development Goals were agreed. Bilateral aid to the least-developed countries fell by 16% in real terms to USD 25 billion, according to provisional data. Much of this drop is explained by exceptionally high debt relief for Myanmar in 2013, but even excluding debt relief ODA to the poorest countries fell by 8%. Bilateral […]

    Development aid stable in 2014 but flows to poorest countries still falling

    Paris 08/04/2015 (OECD) Development aid flows were stable in 2014, after hitting an all-time high in 2013, but aid to the poorest countries continued to fall, according to official data collected by the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). Net official development assistance (ODA) from DAC members totalled USD 135.2 billion, level with a record USD 135.1 billion in 2013, though marking a 0.5% decline in real terms. Net ODA as a share of gross national income was 0.29%, also on a par with 2013. ODA has increased by 66% in real terms since 2000, when the Millennium Development Goals were agreed. Bilateral aid to the least-developed countries fell by 16% in real terms to USD 25 billion, according to provisional data. Much of this drop is explained by exceptionally high debt relief for Myanmar in 2013, but even excluding debt relief ODA to the poorest countries fell by 8%. Bilateral […]

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  • Sustainable Development Solutions is a daily Webzine produced by Karsten Weitzenegger Consulting and many partners. This free knowledge services at http://paper.li/kweitzenegger/development-cooperation aims to comnnect experts and policy makers in developing the Future We Want for All. The content curation service is supported by Paper.li from Lausanne, Switzerland. Karsten Weitzenegger Consulting supports the preparation of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to address the challenges of economic development, social inclusion, environmental sustainability, and good governance. These goals will build on the success of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and finish the job of ending extreme poverty in all its forms.

    Sustainable Development Solutions | Daily Webzine from weitzenegger.de

    Sustainable Development Solutions is a daily Webzine produced by Karsten Weitzenegger Consulting and many partners. This free knowledge services at http://paper.li/kweitzenegger/development-cooperation aims to comnnect experts and policy makers in developing the Future We Want for All. The content curation service is supported by Paper.li from Lausanne, Switzerland. Karsten Weitzenegger Consulting supports the preparation of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to address the challenges of economic development, social inclusion, environmental sustainability, and good governance. These goals will build on the success of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and finish the job of ending extreme poverty in all its forms.

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  • Better education and skills are key to shift the economy up a gear, says latest Latin American Economic Outlook Veracruz, Mexico, 9 December 2014 – Latin America’s GDP growth rate has slowed down in 2014, dropping below 1.5%. This is the first time in a decade that the region grows less than the OECD average, according to the OECD Development Centre, the Commission for Latin American and the Caribbean (UN-ECLAC) and the development bank for Latin America (CAF). Given the projections in the past weeks, any recovery in 2015 is likely to be challenging. In their jointly produced Latin American Economic Outlook 2015, the three organisations call for action to address this slowdown, focusing on the role of education and skills, and noting that despite some recent progress, more needs to be done to raise educational standards and address persistent and substantial socioeconomic inequalities. “If we want to avoid a […]

    Latin American Economic Outlook 2014 calls for better education and skills

    Better education and skills are key to shift the economy up a gear, says latest Latin American Economic Outlook Veracruz, Mexico, 9 December 2014 – Latin America’s GDP growth rate has slowed down in 2014, dropping below 1.5%. This is the first time in a decade that the region grows less than the OECD average, according to the OECD Development Centre, the Commission for Latin American and the Caribbean (UN-ECLAC) and the development bank for Latin America (CAF). Given the projections in the past weeks, any recovery in 2015 is likely to be challenging. In their jointly produced Latin American Economic Outlook 2015, the three organisations call for action to address this slowdown, focusing on the role of education and skills, and noting that despite some recent progress, more needs to be done to raise educational standards and address persistent and substantial socioeconomic inequalities. “If we want to avoid a […]

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  • Around the world, the gap between the rich and poor is spiralling out of control. Extreme inequality is not accidental or inevitable – it’s the result of deliberate policy choices by people in power. Together we must even it up and stop inequality from undermining our fight against poverty. Join Oxfam’s campaign now to close the gap between the rich and the rest. Copyright: Oxfam From Ghana to Germany, Italy to Indonesia, the gap between rich and poor is widening. In 2013, seven out of 10 people lived in countries where economic inequality was worse than 30 years ago, and in 2014 Oxfam calculated that just 85 people owned as much wealth as the poorest half of humanity. Extreme inequality corrupts politics and hinders economic growth. It exacerbates gender inequality, and causes a range of health and social problems. It stifles social mobility, keeping some families poor for generations, while […]

    Economic inequality has reached extreme levels – Oxfam reports

    Around the world, the gap between the rich and poor is spiralling out of control. Extreme inequality is not accidental or inevitable – it’s the result of deliberate policy choices by people in power. Together we must even it up and stop inequality from undermining our fight against poverty. Join Oxfam’s campaign now to close the gap between the rich and the rest. Copyright: Oxfam From Ghana to Germany, Italy to Indonesia, the gap between rich and poor is widening. In 2013, seven out of 10 people lived in countries where economic inequality was worse than 30 years ago, and in 2014 Oxfam calculated that just 85 people owned as much wealth as the poorest half of humanity. Extreme inequality corrupts politics and hinders economic growth. It exacerbates gender inequality, and causes a range of health and social problems. It stifles social mobility, keeping some families poor for generations, while […]

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  • Evaluation reports frequently blame poor monitoring data for preventing a full assessment of programme outcomes. Meanwhile, programme staff often complain that evaluations come too late, too infrequently, and don’t contain much useful information. This illustrates a common problem: the disconnect between monitoring and evaluation reduces the effectiveness of both. A new paper from the DCED addresses this challenge and explores the synergies between M and E, using the example of the DCED Standard, a widely used results measurement framework. Why should evaluators be interested in monitoring? How can monitoring systems support evaluations, and vice versa? Who is responsible for what, and what are the expectations of each? Download: Why_Evaluations_Fail_Aug2014.pdf (PDF, 650 kB)Source: The Donor Committee for Enterprise Development

    Why Evaluations Fail: The Importance of Good Monitoring

    Evaluation reports frequently blame poor monitoring data for preventing a full assessment of programme outcomes. Meanwhile, programme staff often complain that evaluations come too late, too infrequently, and don’t contain much useful information. This illustrates a common problem: the disconnect between monitoring and evaluation reduces the effectiveness of both. A new paper from the DCED addresses this challenge and explores the synergies between M and E, using the example of the DCED Standard, a widely used results measurement framework. Why should evaluators be interested in monitoring? How can monitoring systems support evaluations, and vice versa? Who is responsible for what, and what are the expectations of each? Download: Why_Evaluations_Fail_Aug2014.pdf (PDF, 650 kB)Source: The Donor Committee for Enterprise Development

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  • Boosting productivity key for developing economies to close income gap with advanced countries, says OECD Development Centre Income levels in most developing and emerging countries will not catch up with advanced economies for many decades without efforts to boost productivity, according to a new report by the OECD Development Centre. Developing economies continue to grow faster than more advanced countries. Non-OECD countries’ share in world GDP surpassed that of OECD countries in 2010. Since its first edition in 2010, the annual Perspectives on Global Development has investigated the trends in “shifting wealth”, the increasing economic weight of developing countries in the world economy. “Shifting wealth” has received a boost through the rise of China, which has also led to positive spillover effects on developing economies that supply China’s demand for resource-based products and intermediates. However, even at their higher rates of growth since 2000, the per capita incomes in developing […]

    Perspectives on Global Development 2014: OECD sees productivity as key

    Boosting productivity key for developing economies to close income gap with advanced countries, says OECD Development Centre Income levels in most developing and emerging countries will not catch up with advanced economies for many decades without efforts to boost productivity, according to a new report by the OECD Development Centre. Developing economies continue to grow faster than more advanced countries. Non-OECD countries’ share in world GDP surpassed that of OECD countries in 2010. Since its first edition in 2010, the annual Perspectives on Global Development has investigated the trends in “shifting wealth”, the increasing economic weight of developing countries in the world economy. “Shifting wealth” has received a boost through the rise of China, which has also led to positive spillover effects on developing economies that supply China’s demand for resource-based products and intermediates. However, even at their higher rates of growth since 2000, the per capita incomes in developing […]

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  • 12 recommendations on government reform | Development that Works. This Inter-American Development Bank paper proposes three principles and twelve recommendations: The three principles are: Government capabilities are the outcome over time of endogenous choices by key political actors, as part of a country’s own political equilibrium. Neither institutions, nor governmental capabilities, can be built by fiat, for instance by copying a “best practice” law from another country. Cooperation over time and across administrations is necessary. And the twelve recommendations: Invest in capabilities, not in “buying them computers”. Incentives trump rules: avoid a copy/paste mentality. Focus on “safe bets” reforms. Try to be consistent over time. Try not to be an accomplice of capacity destruction. Foster consensus. Act as enforcement and commitment technology of political agreements against the short-term temptations of actors. Bring on more board players. Accept middle-of-the-ground solutions. Be aware of strategic timing issues. Steer away from the technocratic […]

    12 recommendations on government reform | Development that Works

    12 recommendations on government reform | Development that Works. This Inter-American Development Bank paper proposes three principles and twelve recommendations: The three principles are: Government capabilities are the outcome over time of endogenous choices by key political actors, as part of a country’s own political equilibrium. Neither institutions, nor governmental capabilities, can be built by fiat, for instance by copying a “best practice” law from another country. Cooperation over time and across administrations is necessary. And the twelve recommendations: Invest in capabilities, not in “buying them computers”. Incentives trump rules: avoid a copy/paste mentality. Focus on “safe bets” reforms. Try to be consistent over time. Try not to be an accomplice of capacity destruction. Foster consensus. Act as enforcement and commitment technology of political agreements against the short-term temptations of actors. Bring on more board players. Accept middle-of-the-ground solutions. Be aware of strategic timing issues. Steer away from the technocratic […]

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