Latin America Archive

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ILO calls for reorientation of Latin American labour market policies

ILO: Labour market policies in Latin America must be reoriented to protect social achievements and address productivity gaps At a time when governments in the region face the dual challenges of creating quality jobs and safeguarding achievements in social inclusion and work quality, an ILO report highlights the need for a new approach based on active labour market policies to address the current economic slowdown. Lima, 21 June 2016 (ILO) – The International Labour Organization (ILO) has urged Latin American countries to carry out a “strategic reorientation” of their labour market policies in order to increase productivity and to address rising unemployment and informality resulting from the economic slowdown. The report in Spanish A report warns that “the achievements made since the 2000s, in terms of social inclusion and work quality have stalled and are even beginning to reverse,” which can lead to a dangerous “structural stagnation” in labour markets […]

ILO: Labour market policies in Latin America must be reoriented to protect social achievements and address productivity gaps

At a time when governments in the region face the dual challenges of creating quality jobs and safeguarding achievements in social inclusion and work quality, an ILO report highlights the need for a new approach based on active labour market policies to address the current economic slowdown.

Lima, 21 June 2016 (ILO) – The International Labour Organization (ILO) has urged Latin American countries to carry out a “strategic reorientation” of their labour market policies in order to increase productivity and to address rising unemployment and informality resulting from the economic slowdown.

The report in Spanish

A report warns that “the achievements made since the 2000s, in terms of social inclusion and work quality have stalled and are even beginning to reverse,” which can lead to a dangerous “structural stagnation” in labour markets that could, in turn, generate an increase in inequality and informality and erosion in the middle class”.

“The alarm bells are ringing, the economic slowdown will impact the region’s labour markets in 2016 and over the next years,” said the ILO’s Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, José Manuel Salazar.

“Now what we are talking about are effective solutions. The so-called active labour market policies represent a policy shift that seeks to improve and update the skills of the labour force, readjust labour supply and demand, and promote productive employment. This integrated approach is what labour markets in the region need,” he added.

The report, “What works: Active labour market policies in Latin American and the Caribbean ”, was developed by the ILO’s Research Department in Geneva.

According to the document, despite some years of solid growth in which social progress and unemployment advanced, those achievements were not consolidated, thus revealing structural deficiencies. The report warns that “even with remarkable progress, the shift to a knowledge driven economy and one based on better quality jobs has not been completed”.

ILO specialist Veronica Escudero, one of the authors of the report, warned that “even if these policies have great potential, we need to highlight that the design, targeting and implementation are essential to guarantee their effectiveness.”

In this sense, it is necessary to “be very clear about the employment barriers that people in a country face, as well as the needs of the local labour market, to ensure the relevance of the policies and to maximize their impact, including the number of beneficiaries,” explained Escudero.

An urgent policy reorientation for Latin America and the Caribbean

To tackle unemployment, informality and low productivity growth, a policy reorientation is needed in Latin America and the Caribbean. ILO economists Clemente Pignatti and Verónica Escudero discuss the potential opportunities that can be leveraged from active labour market policies in the region.

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Foro Emprendedurismo para jóvenes en desventaja social

Desarrollo de habilidades emprendedoras en la formación profesional de jóvenes en desventaja social El Programa ‘Desarrollo de habilidades en la formación profesional de desventaja social en Centroamérica’ de la GIZ financiado por el Ministerio Federal de Cooperación Económica y Desarrollo de Alemania (BMZ) 2012-2013, esta cerrado. El grupo continua en Facebook: Foro en Facebook Documentación de nuestros Talleres 5 – 16 de Nov., 2012 – en Mannheim, Alemania: Documentación del Taller 1 8- 13 de Abril. 2013 – en Ciudad de Guatemala: Documentación del Taller 2 23- 26 de septiembre de 2013 – en San Salvador, El Salvador: Documentación del Taller 3

Desarrollo de habilidades emprendedoras en la formación profesional de jóvenes en desventaja social

El Programa ‘Desarrollo de habilidades en la formación profesional de desventaja social en Centroamérica’ de la GIZ financiado por el Ministerio Federal de Cooperación Económica y Desarrollo de Alemania (BMZ) 2012-2013, esta cerrado. El grupo continua en Facebook:

coemprede

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Latin American Economic Outlook 2014 calls for better education and skills

Better education and skills are key to shift the economy up a gear, says latest Latin American Economic Outlook Veracruz, Mexico, 9 December 2014 – Latin America’s GDP growth rate has slowed down in 2014, dropping below 1.5%. This is the first time in a decade that the region grows less than the OECD average, according to the OECD Development Centre, the Commission for Latin American and the Caribbean (UN-ECLAC) and the development bank for Latin America (CAF). Given the projections in the past weeks, any recovery in 2015 is likely to be challenging. In their jointly produced Latin American Economic Outlook 2015, the three organisations call for action to address this slowdown, focusing on the role of education and skills, and noting that despite some recent progress, more needs to be done to raise educational standards and address persistent and substantial socioeconomic inequalities. “If we want to avoid a […]

Better education and skills are key to shift the economy up a gear, says latest Latin American Economic Outlook

Veracruz, Mexico, 9 December 2014 – Latin America’s GDP growth rate has slowed down in 2014, dropping below 1.5%. This is the first time in a decade that the region grows less than the OECD average, according to the OECD Development Centre, the Commission for Latin American and the Caribbean (UN-ECLAC) and the development bank for Latin America (CAF). Given the projections in the past weeks, any recovery in 2015 is likely to be challenging.

In their jointly produced Latin American Economic Outlook 2015, the three organisations call for action to address this slowdown, focusing on the role of education and skills, and noting that despite some recent progress, more needs to be done to raise educational standards and address persistent and substantial socioeconomic inequalities.

“If we want to avoid a decade of low growth in Latin America, we must improve education standards, enhance skills in the workforce and boost innovation. Policymakers need to undertake ambitious efforts to unleash higher and more equitable growth”, OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría said while launching the Outlook at the Ibero-American Summit in Veracruz on 9 December.

Structural change – such as the diversification of the economy towards knowledge-intensive sectors – is needed to supply the increasing demand for skilled workers. As noted by Alicia Bárcena, Executive Secretary of ECLAC, “without the transformation of the production structure there will be a link missing in the chain that connects education, productivity and innovation.”

Such a link has important implications for income distribution. Diversification implies the creation of quality, better-paid jobs, which in turn entails less informality and underemployment – and hence less inequality. Policies for learning and diversification should be at the top of the agenda in the coming years in Latin America and the Caribbean.

“In the absence of an exceptionally favourable external environment, the region needs to deepen regional integration and address the structural challenges of development, to support its growth potential, primarily in the areas of innovation and production patterns, and education and technical capacities that these require”, said Enrique García, CAF President and Chief Executive Officer.

The Outlook notes that, on average, the gap in education performance for a student in secondary school in Latin America relative to an OECD student is still quite high: the equivalent of 2.4 additional years of schooling. Furthermore, socioeconomic inequalities strongly influence both access and education outcomes in the region. Only 56% of students in the poorest quarter of the population attend secondary school, versus 87% of students in the wealthiest quarter.

Limitations in the quality of education are also reflected in the skill shortages and mismatches in the labour market, severely impacting the competitiveness of Latin American companies. The region’s businesses face greater challenges in finding appropriately skilled employees than any other region in the world. The Outlook shows that the probability of a Latin American firm facing obstacles in finding staff with the adequate capabilities is three times higher than a similar firm in South Asia and 13 times higher than a firm in Pacific Asia. The issue is particularly prevalent in key sectors such as the automotive industry and machinery.

To tackle these acute skills shortages, targeted policies are needed in pre-primary, secondary, technical and professional education. Policymakers need to provide more and smarter investment in pre-primary education, where important soft-skills development takes place, such as socialisation and learning perseverance, which are of critical importance in the labour market. Policies are also needed to ensure that resources are redistributed to reduce socio-economic inequalities. Classroom practices need adaption to ensure better performance, including tutoring, managing teacher expectations and student motivation. Increasing the quality of teaching also relies on monitoring and evaluation, and better incentives.

Finally, government and the private sector should work together to better connect technical and vocational training with the demand for skills in a changing world economy.

The Latin American Economic Outlook

Published for the eighth consecutive year, the Latin American Economic Outlook 2015 features a macro-economic analysis of trends in the region and a focus education, skills and innovation for development. The content of the report will be available online on 9 December 2014 on www.latameconomy.org.

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Rethinking Reforms: How Latin America and the Caribbean Can Escape Suppressed World Growth | IDB Report 2013

ILPES
2013 Latin American and Caribbean Macroeconomic Report
The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) invites you to participate in a panel discussion of its 2013 Latin American and Caribbean Macroeconomic Report: Rethinking Reforms: How Latin America and the Caribbean Can Escape Suppressed World Growth. Michael Gavin (Barclays Capital), Andrew Powell (IDB), José Juan Ruiz Gómez (IDB), and Angel Ubide (Peterson Institute) will discuss which reforms could achieve the goal of unhindered growth.

Global growth projections have waned since last year and growth may be suppressed below potential for several years to come. Lower global growth will, all things being equal, imply lower growth in Latin America and the Caribbean. At the same time, clear limits to the potential use of monetary and fiscal policy measures pose another constraint. Consequently, countries should consider further structural reform measures to enhance economic prospects and to escape suppressed global growth. If all countries pursue reforms to enable growth to accelerate by 1.5% on average, then the effect on the region as a whole may reach 2.3% additional growth per annum.

Tuesday, April 9 at 11:30 a.m.
IDB Headquarters, Andrés Bello I Conference Room, 9th Floor
1300 New York Ave., NW, Washington, DC, 20577
REGISTRATION LINK
DOWNLOAD THE REPORT
Webcast: Available only the day of the event through this link

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Up in Smoke – Film about Mike Hands and his Agroforestry system

This is a film about a technique that could save more carbon emissions annually than all global aviation. It is a film about one of the biggest contributors to tropical deforestation and global warming: slash and burn agriculture.

Up in Smoke feature doc – 4’30” trailer from Adam Wakeling on Vimeo.

The film follows British scientist Mike Hands, who has laboured for 25 years to perfect a sustainable farming technique to replace slash and burn farming in equatorial rainforests. And he’s found it.

Get more from Inga Foundation | Sustainable Solutions to Stop Slash and Burn, working with farmers and communities to halt the devastating practice of slash and burn agriculture by providing a sustainable, organic and low cost alternative: Inga alley-cropping.

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EU-LAC – GIGA Seminar, Hamburg, 17-18 September 2012

The EU-LAC Foundation and the GIGA (German Institute of Global and Area Studies) are organising an international seminar “New Grounds for the Relations between the EU, Latin America and the Caribbean – towards a Relevant Partnership” which is taking place in Hamburg on 17th and 18th September 2012.

The countries of the European Union, Latin America and the Caribbean launched the strategic partnership process more than a decade ago. Since then, the global context has changed significantly and the current worldwide economic crisis presents new challenges to the bi-regional partnership. Therefore, the seminar calls for a reflection on the grounds of the partnership between Latin America, Caribbean and the European Union, focussing on the opportunities that the new context provides for both regions and their populations.

Over 80 participants from both regions and various sectors (including academics, high-level officials, opinion makers and entrepreneurs) will discuss topics such as the emergence of new geopolitical poles, the economic and political boom of Latin America, as well as climate change. The seminar will be inaugurated with an opening act by invitation of the First Mayor of Hamburg, Olaf Scholz. Opening speakers include, amongst others, Benita Ferrero-Waldner, President of the EU-LAC Foundation, Detlef Nolte, Acting President of GIGA, and Leonel Fernández, former President of the Dominican Republic and current President of the EU-LAC Foundation’s Strategic Partner FUNGLODE.

Although participation in this seminar is by invitation only, the EU-LAC Foundation will provide public information on the Seminar as it unfolds, including through Twitter. The Foundation’s Twitter Account https://twitter.com/eulacfoundation will be working with full speed by the beginning of September. Please do follow by subscribing here: http://tinyurl.com/bp4h4ln