Cooperation – weitzenegger.de http://www.weitzenegger.de/content Sustainable Development Solutions Fri, 19 Jan 2018 15:52:54 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 https://i0.wp.com/www.weitzenegger.de/content/wp-content/uploads/kwlogoSDG100.gif?fit=32%2C32 Cooperation – weitzenegger.de http://www.weitzenegger.de/content 32 32 36945952 #CrossroadsBonn Conference explores connections between climate change and a just world http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30073 Fri, 03 Nov 2017 11:55:20 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30073 A ten-point memorandum entitled “The Climate – Justice – Cooperation Nexus: 10 Cornerstones of the Great Transformation towards Sustainability” was presented as the outcome of the conference. This memorandum defines key global challenges for the coming years and calls upon state and non-governmental actors to accelerate their efforts to tackle]]>

A ten-point memorandum entitled “The Climate – Justice – Cooperation Nexus: 10 Cornerstones of the Great Transformation towards Sustainability” was presented as the outcome of the conference. This memorandum defines key global challenges for the coming years and calls upon state and non-governmental actors to accelerate their efforts to tackle climate change.

Human wellbeing, peace, security, and the stability of the Earth system are at a crossroads

At this year’s climate conference in Bonn the world finds itself at a crossroads. The talks will no longer be about a mere reduction of greenhouse gases, but will have to discuss a socially responsible decarbonisation of the world economy and a new dynamic of global cooperation in the face of nationalism and xenophobia.

On Monday, 6 November, the highly anticipated 2017 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP23) starts in Bonn. Just before the summit opens its doors for delegates and guests from around the world, the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) are hosting a two-day dialogue conference (http://www.crossroadsbonn.org) back-to-back with COP23 bringing together politics, economy, civil society, academia, artists and the media.

The #CrossroadsBonn Conference was held on 4-5 November 2017 in Bonn, back to back with COP23. We need a new culture of global cooperation, substantiated by mutual respect and support, to make the transformation towards sustainability a reality. This is the main message we want to develop and feed into the climate negotiations.

Karsten Weitzenegger takes part for SID to cover the topics from a practitioner’s viewpoint in search for applicable sustainable development solutions.

Humanity has a clear choice: Will we let this unique opportunity for a global transformation towards sustainability slip through our hands, or will we take action towards ensuring a future in which we live within our planetary boundaries?

Some Weblinks on the Climate Conference in Bonn

]]>
30073
Data for Development | OECD Development Co-operation Report 2017 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30015 Tue, 24 Oct 2017 14:52:32 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30015 Data are a prerequisite for delivering the United Nations (UN) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and ensuring that no one is left behind. The Development Co‑operation Report 2017 focuses on data for development because quality, timely and disaggregated data are crucial for achieving the ultimate goal of development: improving the]]>

Data are a prerequisite for delivering the United Nations (UN) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and ensuring that no one is left behind. The Development Co‑operation Report 2017 focuses on data for development because quality, timely and disaggregated data are crucial for achieving the ultimate goal of development: improving the welfare of people and fighting poverty.

There is, however, a major risk that the continued scarcity of basic data in developing countries about people and the planet, and weak incentives and capacity to fill these gaps, will hold back success.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are putting high demands on national statistical systems the world over. Most countries, including many OECD countries, have not yet started collecting data for many indicators in the UN global SDG indicators framework. The challenges are even more critical for many developing countries with low statistical capabilities. For example, 77 developing countries have inadequate poverty data. Only 56% of countries worldwide have birth registration data that are 90% complete, with just 15% of countries in sub‑Saharan Africa having these data, 33% in Southern Asia and 36% in Southeast Asia. Only 37 countries have national statistical legislation that complies with the UN’s Fundamental Principles of Official Statistics. Serious methodological and strategic challenges still need to be met, including the need to strike a balance between producing the data for global monitoring, on the one hand, and for national policy making on the other.

The report analyses how developing countries and their development co‑operation partners can bridge the data divide by seizing the unprecedented opportunity – and mitigate the risks – presented by the convergence of the power of technology with the most ambitious development plan to date: the 2030 Agenda. New technology and the so‑called data revolution make it easier, faster and cheaper to produce data that decision makers need to make informed choices on policies and priorities. However, simply producing more data is not enough: data must be transformed, analysed and used to be useful for policy making, monitoring and accountability.

The data revolution offers governments and national statistical offices a welcome opportunity to produce more useful data by generating data from new sources, which can complement and strengthen, though not replace, official statistics. Some developing countries are already embarking on the data revolution with positive results. Ethiopia, South Africa, Sri Lanka and Uganda have improved the efficiency and accuracy of census and survey data collection by using computer assisted personal interview devices, such as computer tablets or other handheld devices. Geospatial data are helping national statistical systems monitor socio‑economic and environmental conditions, enabling geographic disaggregation and making geo‑located data more dynamic.

This report identifies ways to bridge the data divide for sustainable development. There is a need for strong political leadership in developing countries to ensure that data enable development. This involves promoting the cause of data for development while making certain that data are produced to high‑quality standards, protecting privacy and confidentiality. The Development Co‑operation Report 2017 recommends six concrete actions to make the most of the power of data for sustainable development.

Data action 1. Make statistical laws, regulations and standards fit for evolving data needs.

To build inclusive data ecosystems that benefit global development and individual citizens, institutional and legal frameworks need to be fit for purpose. The growing number of public, private, and civil society actors and institutions involved in the production and use of data make the need for clear legal, ethical, and quality standards and protocols even more urgent. These should regulate the use of traditional and new sources of data, fostering the trust that is needed to inform good policies and development results.

Data action 2. Improve the quantity and quality of financing for data.

Investing in statistical systems must become a strategic priority for developing countries and their development co‑operation partners alike. Budgets need to grow if national statistical systems are to respond to the growing demand for more and better data. By making data a cross‑cutting priority for development co‑operation, providers can start to recognise it as part of the essential infrastructure for delivering on national, regional and global development commitments.

Data action 3. Boost statistical capacity and data literacy through new approaches.

New, more comprehensive approaches to statistical capacity development need to be developed and piloted that go beyond building capacity to collect data, to building the capacity of national statistical offices to play an evolving and multifunctional role in the data ecosystem, and to improve the institutional and enabling environment for data and statistics.

Data action 4. Increase efficiency and impact through “data compacts” or other co‑ordinated, country‑led approaches.

Developing countries should better align incentives for producing data for national policy making and global monitoring through mutually accountable inclusive partnerships among data producers and users. The establishment of data compacts for co‑ordinating and harmonising investment in data and support for statistical systems is a promising approach; it should be tested further to ensure that it meets the needs of all actors and fosters mutual accountability for delivering on joint, performance‑based action plans.

Data action 5. Invest in and use country‑led results data to monitor progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals.

International development actors must break with the business‑as‑usual approach; rather than collecting and using data to meet their own reporting and accountability pressures, they need to support country‑led strategies and data ecosystems. This requires clear vision and pragmatism in dealing with the pressure to attribute results to every aid dollar. It also means ensuring that results from any independent data collection efforts are accessible to all development actors and co ordinated with the statistical objectives of developing country governments.

Data action 6. Produce and use better data to help understand the overall state of SDG financing.

Data on development finance also need to improve. This means producing a comprehensive financing picture by increasing the availability and transparency of quality development finance data and improving methodologies and standards with the objective of equipping developing countries to plan and budget their national development strategies and priorities.

Read the full book on: 10.1787/dcr-2017-en

]]>
30015
The European External Investment Plan to boost jobs and growth in developing countries http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30096 Fri, 06 Oct 2017 09:09:20 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30096 The European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD) is the heart piece of the EU’s new External Investment Plan (EIP). Its role is to help boosting private and public investment in our partner countries to address some of the obstacles to growth and some root reasons for irregular migration. The EFSD]]>

The European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD) is the heart piece of the EU’s new External Investment Plan (EIP). Its role is to help boosting private and public investment in our partner countries to address some of the obstacles to growth and some root reasons for irregular migration.

The EFSD Strategic Board includes the EU Member States and the European Investment Bank, as well as the European Parliament as observer.

At its first meeting yesterday, it discussed rules of procedure, strategic orientations and proposals for concrete areas for investment, the so-called “investment windows”. These windows define priority sectors for the EFSD Guarantee, identified as essential for the creation of decent and sustainable jobs in Africa and the EU Neighbourhood.

The Strategic Board has sent a strong message about the EU’s firm commitment to rapid and efficient implementation of the EIP.

First windows to be announced soon

The first investment windows are expected to be approved shortly, so that the EIP can start to make a real difference for beneficiaries on the ground.

At the launch stage, five windows are considered essential :

“Sustainable Energy and Sustainable Connectivity“: targeting sectors such as renewable energy, energy efficiency and transport, enhancing energy security and sustainable development, while addressing climate change risks and helping countries deliver on their commitments to implement the Paris Agreement.

“Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) Financing“: addressing the main constraints hampering MSMEs development by adopting a differentiated approach. This will result in increased jobs opportunities, especially in countries affected by conditions of fragility, whilst promoting the progressive graduation of businesses from the informal economy.

Sustainable agriculture, rural entrepreneurs and agroindustry“: responding to the lack of financing mechanisms adapted to farmers and agri-entrepreneurs, particularly for smallholders, cooperatives and agribusiness MSMEs, in the aim of promoting inclusive and sustainable growth.

“Sustainable cities”: exploring innovative mechanisms to address the challenges of sustainable urban development faced by partner countries.

“Digitalisation for Sustainable Development”: focussing on innovative digital solutions, especially those addressing local social needs and financial inclusion and promoting decent job creation.

Background

The EU Agenda for Change emphasises the support of inclusive growth and job creation as a key priority of EU external cooperation. In this context, blending is recognised as an important vehicle for leveraging additional resources and increasing the impact of EU aid.

The European Commission proposed on 14 September 2016 an ambitious External Investment Plan (EIP) to encourage investment in our partner countries in Africa and the EU Neighbourhood region, to strengthen our partnerships and contribute to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, helping to address some root causes of migration.

Part of the EIP is the new European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD) as an integral financing mechanism to support investments by public financial institutions and the private sector.

Moving ahead with the EIP’s rapid implementation, the first Strategic Board of the European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD) met in Brussels on 28 September, on the same day that the entry into force of the regulation establishing the European Fund for Sustainable Development.

The European Investment Plan (EIP) was proposed by President Juncker in September 2016. Already a year later, the EIP is becoming operational.

In order to foster sustainable development, the EIP will integrate a new generation of financial instruments into more traditional forms of assistance such as grants – namely guarantees, risk sharing instruments, as well as the blending of grants and loans.

Substantial technical assistance will help beneficiaries producing more mature and financially viable projects and businesses. The EU will also step up its dialogue with partner countries, as well as a structured private sector dialogue to improve the investment climate and the business environment in the respective partner countries.

The EIP’s innovative and holistic approach builds on the Commission’s blended finance instruments, bringing together lessons learned over ten years of blending activities.

More details on the results obtained by each regional investment facility can be retrieved on:
]]>
30096
Germany to support developing countries in the World Trade Organization #WTO http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29989 Wed, 30 Aug 2017 16:09:57 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29989 Germany is expanding its trade policy support for developing countries. The Federal Government has decided this today. Developing countries need support in particular when it comes to implementing the legal requirements of the World Trade Organization (WTO). This applies, for example, to dispute settlement procedures where two countries are divided]]>

Germany is expanding its trade policy support for developing countries. The Federal Government has decided this today. Developing countries need support in particular when it comes to implementing the legal requirements of the World Trade Organization (WTO). This applies, for example, to dispute settlement procedures where two countries are divided on whether WTO law has been respected. Here the developing countries receive support from the “Advisory Center on WTO Law“. Germany is now intensifying its commitment to this organization.


Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller: “We are taking another step towards making the WTO a fair trade organization. We are strengthening the position of the developing countries so that they can share their rights.”

With the decision of the Federal Cabinet, Germany now wants to become an associate member of the Advisory Center on WTO Law. Germany is thus implementing an important element of the partnership with Africa, which the G20 agreed under the German Presidency this year.

Developing countries often lack the capacities to assert their rights in the WTO. This is where the Advisory Center on WTO Law is set up and strengthens the developing countries in WTO legal questions.

The Advisory Center on WTO Law was founded on the margins of the 1999 World Trade Conference. It is independent of the World Trade Organization and provides legal assistance to developing countries in WTO dispute settlement procedures. It also advises them in WTO legal affairs and organizes courses in WTO law. Currently, the Center is actively involved in 16 dispute settlement procedures. It is a recognized good and cost-effective service provider for developing countries.

As in the case of every industrialized country, the associated status of Germany is about € 370,000 per year for a period of five years.

Source: BMZ. http://www.bmz.de/20170830-1

]]>
29989
EU-ASEAN Capacity Building Project for Monitoring Integration Progress and Statistics (COMPASS) http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29979 Wed, 09 Aug 2017 07:59:34 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29979 Karsten Weitzenegger is in Jakarta, Indonesia in August 2017 to develop a tailored monitoring and evaluation system for the COMPASS project. He updates the COMPASS log frame and establishes a dynamic system of follow-up to ensure the indicators are true and relevant and enable a stronger reporting process of project’s]]>

Karsten Weitzenegger is in Jakarta, Indonesia in August 2017 to develop a tailored monitoring and evaluation system for the COMPASS project. He updates the COMPASS log frame and establishes a dynamic system of follow-up to ensure the indicators are true and relevant and enable a stronger reporting process of project’s outcomes and impacts and thus a better steering of the project.

Funded by the European Commission, the EU-ASEAN Statistical Capacity Building Project (COMPASS) is based on the central premise that ASEAN’s internal integration as well as its integration into the global economy serve to accelerate economic development in the less developed countries in the region and to narrow the gap among its Member States.

Building on achievements of the EU-ASEAN Statistical Capacity Building Programme (EASCAB, 2009-2013), COMPASS helps ASEAN integration through the availability and utilisation of more timely, comparable and relevant information. COMPASS facilitates monitoring and decision-making, notably by ASEAN governments acting individually and at ASEAN level. COMPASS is implemented by Expertise France.

The project has two objectives:

COMPASS activities

  • Graduation Ceremony for the Statistics Master’s CLMV Scholars
    by compass on 11 July 2017 at 07:11

    The COMPASS Team Leader, Yannick Bineau, jointly with the IB Lead Expert, Romulo Virola, attended on the 22 June 2017, the Ceremonial Graduation Ceremony for the Statistics Master’s CLMV Scholars at the University Diliman in Manilla (Philippines). During this Ceremony, six scholars from National Statistical institutions of Cambodia, Lao and Read mor […]

  • Technical Assistance to DICA on FDIS
    by compass on 30 June 2017 at 07:24

    The 4th TA mission since the beginning of COMPASS was organized by the FDIS Lead Expert to DICA (Yangon, Myanmar) between 13-25 March 2017. The Short-term expert provided follow-up to DICA in the constitution of a register of FDI enterprises. The expert also assisted DICA in the launching of a Read mor […]

  • National Training Workshop on SITS
    by compass on 30 June 2017 at 07:23

    A three-day national training workshop was organized in Siem Reap (Cambodia), around a succession of presentations by the COMPASS short-term expert and practical exercises to validate the appropriation of the training material by all participants. Most of the Balance of Payment unit team of the National Bank of Cambodia took Read mor […]

  • 5th Project Steering Committee
    by compass on 30 June 2017 at 07:23

    The 21st, March 2017, the 5th Project Steering Committee was organized back to back to a Regional workshop on AEC 2025 M&E Workshop Framework in the context of ACSS Strategic Plan. The Team Leader and IB Lead Expert as well as representatives of Expertise France and of European Union Delegation Read mor […]

  • Technical Assistance on MDG/SDGs to ACSS
    by compass on 30 June 2017 at 07:22

    A Technical Assistance mission was organized between 21 February to 3 March at ASEC, on providing support to the ASEAN work on the final MDG reporting and first steps of the SDG reporting. The mission was to work with the ASEAN Statistical Office and by e-mail with the national representatives Read mor […]

]]>
29979
Civil society & the SDGs – notes & next steps from #HLPF http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30038 Tue, 08 Aug 2017 22:24:32 +0000 http://weitzenegger.wordpress.com/?p=28925 Read More Civil society & the SDGs – notes & next steps from #HLPF]]> At last month´s UN High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development, over 2,500 representatives from civil society joined governments to review implementation efforts for the Sustainable Development Goals. The global forum resulted in a Ministerial Declaration, which Action for Sustainable Development produced a response. 5 key points from our statement:

  • The Leave No One Behind commitment received little emphasis from the 44 countries presenting voluntary reports on goal progress at the national level;
  • Civil society rights are being violated in a majority of UN member states, limiting the capacity of citizens and community organisations to help implement the goals;
  • The relationship between the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Climate Change Agreement needs to be further incorporated into the reporting framework of the High Level Political Forum;
  • The United Nations needs to do more to compare national progress reports between member states and the independent assessments from civil society;
  • Civil society still often lacks a formal role in goal implementation and monitoring

On the sidelines of the High Level Political Forum, Action for Sustainable Development convened a two day workshop with over 150 civil society representatives to assess the state of goal progress and cross-sector partnerships at the national level. National civil society reports were presented from Argentina, Brazil, India, Japan, Kenya, Nepal, Nigeria, The Philippines and Zimbabwe (see reports, presentations and meeting notes). These national reports provided an opportunity to identify trends in the implementation of the goals as well as determine discrepancies between government and civil society assessments of goal progress.

The meeting was also used do some programmatic planning for the network´s four working groups: Monitoring & Accountability, Policy & Advocacy, Public Mobilisation, Innovative Solutions. Each Working Group adopted work plans to ensure the full potential of the volunteer hours that have been pledged towards the achievement of 8 core deliverables.

Please support these activities by volunteering your time and expertise. We will be reviewing progress and planning more joint actions at the following global meetings over the coming months:

DATE EVENT/MILESTONE WHERE ACTION4SD ENGAGEMENT
12-21 August UNLEASH SDGs Innovation Lab Copenhagen, Denmark A group of Action4SD members are being sponsored to attend this global meeting to design implementation programs for the SDGs
22-24 September Second anniversary of adoption of the SDGs Worldwide Action4SD will be organising public mobilisation activities in communities around the world
6-17 November Climate Change Negotiations (COP23) Bonn, Germany Action4SD will be at the negotiations to focus on strengthening policy coherence and program implementation between the SDGs and Paris Climate Agreement
4-8 December International Civil Society Week Suva, Fiji Action4SD will be doing programmatic planning for 2018 with civil society from the pacific and around the world

 

Can´t join us in person? Please take a couple minutes to complete one of our online consultations and tell us about which civil society SDG initiatives are happening in your country.

In solidarity and shared aspirations, 

Action for Sustainable Development

More info at www.action4sd.org | Twitter @Action4SD | Email info@action4sd.org

]]>
30038
‘Paris: our values, our future’ | CdM statement on Trump and climate change http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29139 Fri, 16 Jun 2017 07:51:03 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29139 Karsten Weitzenegger has signed the follwoing Statement ‘Paris: our values, our future’ by  Club de Madrid leaders. We regret Trump’s decision of pulling out from the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. Former Presidents and Primer Ministers, plus experts and CdM advisors, call upon every signatory to show urgency and commitment in]]>

Karsten Weitzenegger has signed the follwoing Statement ‘Paris: our values, our future’ by  Club de Madrid leaders. We regret Trump’s decision of pulling out from the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. Former Presidents and Primer Ministers, plus experts and CdM advisors, call upon every signatory to show urgency and commitment in the fight against global warming.

 

PARIS, OUR VALUES, OUR FUTURE

 

Climate Change is an undeniable reality affecting the planet and humankind. It is an existential threat. For over a decade, the Club de Madrid and its more than 100 Members have been vigorously advocating for an ambitious, effective and fair global climate regime. President Trump’s decision to withdraw the U.S. from the landmark 2015 Paris Climate Agreement has left us and many around the world baffled and concerned, not only about the future of global climate and environmental policy, but also about the impact that this decision may have on international relations moving forward.
The 2015 Paris Agreement was a historical, forward looking milestone, in process and responsibility. Intense negotiations brought 195 nations to agree to voluntarily tackle climate change. Relinquishing the U.S. responsibility and role in the new, global climate regime, as well as in the revolutionary clean energy transition resulting from it, is not only likely to affect the attainment of the Paris Agreement goals, it will open up a geopolitical vacuum with unpredictable and possibly regrettable consequence.
We deeply regret the Trump Administration’s decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement. In spite of the U.S. withdrawal, we shall forcefully and enthusiastically persist with the line of action launched 10 years ago with our Global Leadership for Climate Action Initiative. We shall strengthen and endeavor to mobilize political will in countries, cities, business and among citizens for far-reaching and effective action to meet the Paris commitments to prevent catastrophic climate change.
Climate change is not just an environmental issue. Climate actions are certainly not preventing the US ‘from conducting its internal economic affairs’ or imposing draconian financial and economic burdens’’ or massive future legal liability’ on the US ‘while imposing no meaningful obligations on the world’s leading polluters’. The Paris Agreement, in fact, opens up an opportunity to expand market options for all. Already in 2007, the McKinsey Global Institute highlighted opportunities for efficiency gains, shifts to lower-carbon energy sources, and expanded carbon sinks with initial capital costs completely offset by savings in future energy costs. They noted that “concerted efforts to reduce GHG emissions would…stimulate economic forces and create business opportunities that we cannot foresee today and that may accelerate the rate of abatement…, thereby reducing the overall cost.” Ten years later, there is even greater consensus on this.
As former democratic Presidents and Prime Ministers from around the globe, we call upon each and every other signatory of the Paris Agreement to show greater urgency and commitment in the fight against global warming and bolster their support of the Paris Accord.  We welcome the bold and firm determination of many states, cities, counties and companies in the U.S. to pursue ambitious policies to address climate change and support the transition to a cleaner energy system. We encourage other subnational entities to follow suit stand ready to engage with stakeholders in the US to bring light to the real issue at hand. It is time to speak truth to power and to advance on a positive, constructive and saner path in every family, community and nation. Climate change must remain paramount on the global agenda and truth must prevail in the end, for the sake of our planet and the future of mankind.
Likewise, we urge all stakeholders to further and strengthen trust between the North and the South and establish an equitable basis and new modalities for genuine international cooperation in addressing the challenges of energy and climate security.

Climate Change is much more than just facts, figures and degrees. This is about our values and our future. The Paris Agreement must be a commitment that becomes reality for the sake of our planet and that of future generations.

]]>
29139
EU leaders sign New European Consensus on Development http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29135 Wed, 07 Jun 2017 21:01:05 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29135 The European Union and its Member States signed today the EU’s new overarching development policy, aiming to tackle climate change, migration and security problems. The jointly developed strategy, in the form of a Joint Statement, was signed today during the annual two-day European Development Days  by Parliament President Antonio Tajani,]]>

The European Union and its Member States signed today the EU’s new overarching development policy, aiming to tackle climate change, migration and security problems.

The jointly developed strategy, in the form of a Joint Statement, was signed today during the annual two-day European Development Days  by Parliament President Antonio Tajani, the Prime Minister of Malta, Joseph Muscat, on behalf of the Council and Member States, the President of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker and the High Representative/Vice President, Federica Mogherini.

The New European Consensus on Development is a common framework for European development efforts, applying to all EU Institutions and all Member States, which commit to work more closely together. It keeps poverty eradication as a number one priority, aims to swiftly implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development into EU policy, aligns the private sector’s involvement in social and environmental standards and offers more democratic oversight of financial tools, which tackle the root causes of migration.

MEPs endorsed a recent informal deal with ministers on the New Consensus, revising the 2005 European Consensus on Development on 1 June.

The reform of the EU’s development policy is linked to new global challenges and to the adoption of the 2030 Agenda at the UN Summit in 2015.

Further information

]]>
29135
Development aid rises again in 2016 but flows to poorest countries dip http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29096 Tue, 11 Apr 2017 14:57:28 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29096 11/04/2017 – Development aid reached a new peak of USD 142.6 billion in 2016, an increase of 8.9% from 2015 after adjusting for exchange rates and inflation. A rise in aid spent on refugees in donor countries boosted the total – but even stripping out refugee costs aid rose 7.1%,]]>

11/04/2017 – Development aid reached a new peak of USD 142.6 billion in 2016, an increase of 8.9% from 2015 after adjusting for exchange rates and inflation. A rise in aid spent on refugees in donor countries boosted the total – but even stripping out refugee costs aid rose 7.1%, according to official data collected by the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC).

 

Despite this progress, the 2016 data show that bilateral (country to country) aid to the least-developed countries fell by 3.9% in real terms from 2015 and aid to Africa fell 0.5%, as some DAC members backtracked on a commitment to reverse past declines in flows to the poorest countries.

Official development assistance (ODA) from the 29 DAC member countries averaged 0.32% of gross national income (GNI), up from 0.30% in 2015, as aid volumes rose in most donor countries. Measured in real terms – correcting for inflation and currency fluctuations – ODA has doubled (up 102%) since 2000.

 

ODA spent on hosting refugees inside donor countries jumped by 27.5% in real terms from 2015 to reach USD 15.4 billion. That equates to 10.8% of total net ODA, up from 9.2% in 2015 and 4.8% in 2014. Many donor countries have seen unprecedented inflows of refugees in the last two years, and the DAC is working to clarify its ODA reporting rules to ensure that refugee costs do not eat into funding for development. Humanitarian aid rose by 8% in real terms in 2016 to USD 14.4 billion.

 

“While governments should be commended for sustaining investment in development during these difficult times, it is unacceptable that – once again – aid to the poorest countries is in decline. Recent signals from some donor countries on future aid levels add further cause for concern”, said OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría. “Major donor nations have committed to refocus their efforts on the least developed countries. It is now time to turn these commitments into action. Together, we must pay close attention to where the money is going and what is being included in foreign aid.”

 

A 1988 DAC rule allows donor countries to count certain refugee expenses as ODA for the first year after their arrival. Australia, Japan, Korea and Luxembourg did not count any refugee costs as ODA in 2016 but 11 countries spent over 10% of their ODA on refugees. Among them, Austria, Germany, Greece and Italy used over 20% of ODA for refugee costs.

Click here to download ODA figures in Excel
Overall, total net ODA rose in 22 countries in 2016, with the biggest increases in the Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Poland, Slovak Republic, Slovenia and Spain. For some the increases were due to higher refugee costs. ODA fell in seven countries, with the largest declines seen in Australia, Finland, the Netherlands and Sweden. Of the several non-DAC members who report their aid flows to the OECD body, the United Arab Emirates posted the highest ODA/GNI ratio in 2016 at 1.12%.

Download the underlying data in Excel 

* All data is net ODA which excludes loan repayments

2016 saw Germany join five other countries – Denmark, Luxembourg, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom – in meeting a United Nations target to keep ODA at or above 0.7% of GNI. The Netherlands slipped back below 0.7% to join 22 other donors under the threshold.

 

ODA makes up more than two thirds of external finance for least-developed countries and the DAC is pushing for it to be better used as a lever to generate private investment and domestic tax revenues in poor countries, and in turn to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

 

“I am pleased to see DAC donors delivering another annual increase in development aid and I hope this rising trend will continue”, said DAC Chair Charlotte Petri Gornitzka. “At the same time, much of this latest increase is in humanitarian aid and spending on refugees in donor countries. While both of these are highly important, we must ensure that we also maintain financing of long-term development programmes, especially in the least developed nations.”

 

Within 2016 ODA, contributions by DAC donors to multilateral organisations rose by nearly 10% in real terms. The share of multilateral aid (aid provided via multilateral bodies) to bilateral aid (aid is provided directly by one country to another) is now roughly half to half.

]]>
29096
Slight increase of global aid explained by rise of in-donor refugees’ costs http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29092 Tue, 11 Apr 2017 14:51:13 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29092 Brussels, 11 April 2017 – For two consecutive years, global development aid has increased, according to the latest figures released today by the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). The 2016 statistics report an increase of 8.9% (USD 142.6 billion). However, 1.8% of this increase actually stayed in the donor country,]]>

Brussels, 11 April 2017 – For two consecutive years, global development aid has increased, according to the latest figures released today by the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). The 2016 statistics report an increase of 8.9% (USD 142.6 billion). However, 1.8% of this increase actually stayed in the donor country, including EU Member States, with relatively little effect on poverty eradication and sustainable development since it is used to cover in-donor costs to address the refugee crises. At the same time, net global bilateral ODA to least developed countries fell by 3.9% in 2016 (USD 24 billion).

While 10.7% of the world’s popuation still live in extreme poverty [1] and world’s inequality is rising [2], EU Member States again failed collectively to meet the 0.7% ODA/GNI target with EU aid reaching 0.51% of their collective GNI which remains off track to meet the 0.7% target by 2020. Indeed, only 5 EU countries respected their commitment: Denmark, Luxembourg, Sweden and the United Kingdom welcoming Germany to this short list. Unfortunately, the Netherlands dropped out of that select group for the first time since 1974.

EU aid did increase by 13.1% (USD 81.3 billion) but much of this reflects growing in-donor refugee costs. DAC rule allows donor countries to count certain refugee expenses as ODA; Germany spent over 20% of ODA for refugee costs in 2016.

 

The achievement of the 0.7 percent target in the election year is a swindle. A large amount of the total expenditure is spent on domestic refugee costs. Germany thus inflates the spending on development cooperation and remains the largest recipient of its own resources for development cooperation. We strongly discourage other EU countries to follow this path.

Bernd Bornhorst

Chairman, VENRO, the German NGDOs platform

In spite of this inflated global increase, CONCORD, the European Confederation of Relief and Development NGOs, regrets that aid is being diverted from the countries most in need. Development aid is being instrumentalised as an incentive for governments to cooperate with the EU on its migration and security measures.

Supporting refugees arriving in Europe is absolutely the right thing to do, and something we as Europeans should be proud of. But counting in donor refugee costs as aid – money spent in the  donor country which never reaches a developing country – is of questionable development impact at best and certainly an attempt to artificially inflate countries’ aid figures. Aid should be used to support people out of poverty and help to promote sustainable, long-term change in developing countries – including tackling the root causes of forced migration.

Amy Dodd

Steering group member for the CONCORD Financing for Development working structure and Director of the UK Aid Network

CONCORD worries that this trend could be the basis of the renewed EU Consensus on Development. Such an approach is not acceptable in a document that will guide the implementation of the 2030 Agenda at EU level.

]]>
29092
EU supports the Caribbean private sector http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30067 Sun, 02 Apr 2017 15:21:07 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30067 The Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export) and the European Union (EU) have signed the 11th European Development Fund (EDF) agreement worth EUR 24 Million to support regional private sector development. At the 11th EDF launch and signing ceremony, held yesterday at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre, Barbados, Head of]]>

The Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export) and the European Union (EU) have signed the 11th European Development Fund (EDF) agreement worth EUR 24 Million to support regional private sector development.

At the 11th EDF launch and signing ceremony, held yesterday at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre, Barbados, Head of Delegation of the EU to Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean, the OECS, and CARICOM/CARIFORUM, Amb. Daniela Tramacere highlighted that the EU remained the largest grant aid donor in the world and have set aside a total of 364 million euros for regional development; a substantial increase to the amount of aid provided under the previous regional development fund. Of this current EDF cycle which runs from 2014-2020 the Caribbean Export Development Agency will implement the 24 million euro 11th EDF Regional Private Sector Development Programme (RPSDP).

The Agency which celebrated its 20th Anniversary last year will continue to build upon the two decades of successful EDF Programme implementation and “this new Regional Private Sector Development Programme places even more emphasis on the development of the private sector as both a beneficiary and a partner in the delivery of the EPA” commented Amb. Tramacere. Pamela Coke-Hamilton, Executive Director at Caribbean Export reported that after the signing of the CARIFORUM-EU Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) in 2008, exports from CARIFORUM to the European Union grew by 10% between 2009-2015, and indicated that countries such as Belize and the Dominican Republic experienced increased European exports: 20% and 34% respectively between the same period. “I would like to thank the European Union for their continued support in investing in private sector development and for being a true partner to the Caribbean region,” concluded Ms. Coke Hamilton. Source: www.carib-export.com

  • Caribbean Export brings regional designers to CARIFESTA XIII
    by Michelle Nurse on 11 August 2017 at 15:13

    BRIDGETOWN – At this year’s CARIFESTA XIII hosted in Barbados, the Caribbean Export Development Agency (Caribbean Export) will be facilitating the participation of designers and artisans from across CARIFORUM within their Design Caribbean and Caribbean Essence export promotion platforms. The assistance, in the tune of 50 000 euros is funded by the European Union (EU) via the ... […]

]]>
30067
Karsten Weitzenegger joins Action4SD http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29004 Tue, 06 Dec 2016 09:11:42 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29004 Karsten Weitzenegger supports ACTION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT http://action4sd.org and calls civil society organisations to become members of this global platform. From the Mission Statement We see the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change as opportunities to move towards such transformation. If these commitments are]]>

Logo.Action4SDKarsten Weitzenegger supports ACTION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT http://action4sd.org and calls civil society organisations to become members of this global platform.

From the Mission Statement

We see the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change as opportunities to move towards such transformation. If these commitments are met, we have a chance of saving the planet and delivering just outcomes for all people. This agenda is the responsibility of us all, not just those we put into political office . The sustainable development agenda is a social contract between the people and public authorities. Democratic and participatory processes where people are able to effectively contribute are critical to achieving this agenda. We come together to inspire and to commit to actions that empower all peoples, especially those who have been marginalised, and in order to collectively tackle the root causes of inequalities, injustice, human rights violations, poverty, environmental degradation and climate change.

We want a world where social, environmental and development justice is assured and all people are able to live in a prosperous, healthy, secure and peaceful environment. We urgently need a world where everyone is able to equally and freely participate and influence the decisions that affect their lives and hold governments, international institutions, private sector and other stakeholders to account. We want an inclusive society where everyone has the right to express themselves in a way that their voices are heard , respected and can directly shape the decision-making process . Our vision is a transformational shift that ensures gender justice and equality, enabling everyone to live their lives in dignity, free from hunger and from the fear of violence, oppression, discrimination or injustice – including due to gender identity or sexual orientation – in a way that protects the planetary systems required to sustain all life on earth.

We want to see a world where a phrase like ‘leave no one behind’ actually delivers for those who are at risk of marginalisation. We will strive to combat inequalities of all forms, between and within countries. We commit to take actions that are accountable and responsive to local needs. We want a new global approach where the economic and financial systems are an instrument to deliver wellbeing for all. This implies an economic model that is not based on debts; where trade is not an objective on its own, but a way to distribute goods and services equitably; where labour standards and limits of planetary boundaries are respected; where local and regional trade, small and medium social enterprises and cooperatives are supported to achieve sustainable consumption and production.
An economic approach where the global trading system is just, people-responsive and where developing countries have the right to develop according to their own models.

We further call for a holistic approach that recognises the balance of economic, natural and social rights, as set out by traditional and indigenous wisdoms. We also need a financial system which supports and does not contradict sustainable development. Fair financial mechanisms and investments are crucial and we will push for robust implementation of commitments made, including the Financing for Sustainable Development process.

We come together to support each other in achieving this world we urgently need

Current areas of work are:

  1. Policy & Advocacy. We will analyse and ask tough questions where we see problems, risks and shortcomings; we will work in a coordinated way to push power-holders to deliver better outcomes for people and planet.
  2. Monitoring & Accountability. We will actively monitor implementation of the agreed agenda and invest in the capacity and agency of civil society to monitor progress on sustainable development.
  3. Innovative solutions. We will showcase examples of how civil society is itself delivering on the sustainable development agenda, not just to highlight best practice and innovation, but also to hold ourselves accountable. We will share inspiring ideas and resources tomake sure that alternative solutions are grounded in local needs.
  4. Public mobilisation. Recognising that this should be a People’s Agenda, we will work to familiarise the public with sustainable development and the commitments made by governments, in order to promote people- powered accountability and support the mobilisation of people. We will organise solidarity actions with people working for sustainable development and cooperate with others to build a people’s movement.

Latest Activities

]]>
29004