Global Agenda – weitzenegger.de http://www.weitzenegger.de/content Sustainable Development Solutions Fri, 19 Jan 2018 15:52:54 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 https://i0.wp.com/www.weitzenegger.de/content/wp-content/uploads/kwlogoSDG100.gif?fit=32%2C32 Global Agenda – weitzenegger.de http://www.weitzenegger.de/content 32 32 36945952 #CrossroadsBonn Conference explores connections between climate change and a just world http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30073 Fri, 03 Nov 2017 11:55:20 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30073 A ten-point memorandum entitled “The Climate – Justice – Cooperation Nexus: 10 Cornerstones of the Great Transformation towards Sustainability” was presented as the outcome of the conference. This memorandum defines key global challenges for the coming years and calls upon state and non-governmental actors to accelerate their efforts to tackle]]>

A ten-point memorandum entitled “The Climate – Justice – Cooperation Nexus: 10 Cornerstones of the Great Transformation towards Sustainability” was presented as the outcome of the conference. This memorandum defines key global challenges for the coming years and calls upon state and non-governmental actors to accelerate their efforts to tackle climate change.

Human wellbeing, peace, security, and the stability of the Earth system are at a crossroads

At this year’s climate conference in Bonn the world finds itself at a crossroads. The talks will no longer be about a mere reduction of greenhouse gases, but will have to discuss a socially responsible decarbonisation of the world economy and a new dynamic of global cooperation in the face of nationalism and xenophobia.

On Monday, 6 November, the highly anticipated 2017 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP23) starts in Bonn. Just before the summit opens its doors for delegates and guests from around the world, the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) are hosting a two-day dialogue conference (http://www.crossroadsbonn.org) back-to-back with COP23 bringing together politics, economy, civil society, academia, artists and the media.

The #CrossroadsBonn Conference was held on 4-5 November 2017 in Bonn, back to back with COP23. We need a new culture of global cooperation, substantiated by mutual respect and support, to make the transformation towards sustainability a reality. This is the main message we want to develop and feed into the climate negotiations.

Karsten Weitzenegger takes part for SID to cover the topics from a practitioner’s viewpoint in search for applicable sustainable development solutions.

Humanity has a clear choice: Will we let this unique opportunity for a global transformation towards sustainability slip through our hands, or will we take action towards ensuring a future in which we live within our planetary boundaries?

Some Weblinks on the Climate Conference in Bonn

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Solutions Summit 2017 highlights projects that advance the objectives of one or more of the 17 SDGs http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29997 Wed, 13 Sep 2017 10:17:20 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29997 Solutions selected for SOLUTIONS SUMMIT 2017 Solutions Summit is an annual catalytic gathering at United Nations Headquarters in New York during UN General Assembly high-level week in September. This initiative lifts-up and advances the work of exceptional teams already developing innovative solutions that address the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This]]>
Solutions selected for SOLUTIONS SUMMIT 2017
Solutions Summit is an annual catalytic gathering at United Nations Headquarters in New York during UN General Assembly high-level week in September. This initiative lifts-up and advances the work of exceptional teams already developing innovative solutions that address the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
This year’s Solutions Summit will take place from 19-21 September from 12:00-1:00pm each day in the UN SDG Media Zone – a live broadcast event space at the United Nations focused on the SDGs – and will involve in-person accelerator sessions and social media interaction with the selected solution-makers.
WHO IS ORGANIZING THE EFFORT?
The Solutions Summit is led by the UN Foundation, UN-NGLS, shift7, and the Global Innovation Exchange. UN-NGLS coordinated the open and transparent application and selection process to curate solutions to be featured during the Solutions Summit, involving a Selection Committee of 25 top innovators and technologists from around the world.
SOLUTIONS SELECTED
The Selection Committee agreed a short-list of 35 solutions from 535 applications received, and the Solutions Summit lead organizers selected the following 11 extraordinary solution-makers:
The leaders of these projects – a regionally and gender balanced group – will each give a ‘lightning talk’ outlining their breakthrough efforts at United Nations Headquarters on 19-21 September.
MORE INFORMATION
For more information, please visit: http://solutions-summit.org
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Karsten Weitzenegger supports AIM2Flourish http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29162 Tue, 25 Jul 2017 23:48:41 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29162 Invited by partners in the Americas, Karsten Weitzenegger has joind AIM2Flourish, the higher-education curriculum for the UN Sustainable Development Goals and business for good innovation. AIM2Flourish is the world’s first global initiative steering future business leaders towards achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and a flourishing world for all.]]>

Invited by partners in the Americas, Karsten Weitzenegger has joind AIM2Flourish, the higher-education curriculum for the UN Sustainable Development Goals and business for good innovation.

AIM2Flourish is the world’s first global initiative steering future business leaders towards achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and a flourishing world for all. We offer a highly adaptable, professor-facilitated curriculum that combines classroom learning about transformative business models with the outside experience of students interviewing innovative CEOs.

AIM2Flourish.com

AIM2Flourish

AIM2Flourish is the world’s first higher-education curriculum for the UN Sustainable Development Goals and business for good innovation. Using the UN SDGs as their lens, students research and identify an innovation and interview a business leader about it. Their stories live on the AIM2Flourish.com platform as sources of inspiration for others. We will celebrate the best-of-the-best stories and recognize students, professors, and business leaders with the first Flourish Prizes at the June 2017 Fourth Global Forum at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

The AIM2Flourish team supports business school professors around the world by providing videos, classroom presentations, and materials. We also offer monthly Professor Community video conferences, during which professors share their experiences and hear what’s new with the program.

Students experience “Do Good, Do Well” leadership first-hand through conversations with business leaders and publishing their stories of innovation on AIM2Flourish.com.

Demonstrating global reach, scalability, and impact potential, AIM2Flourish’s partners reach more than 2,100 management schools worldwide and the global “business for good” community.

We’re grateful to be an initiative of the Fowler Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit at Weatherhead School of Management – Case Western Reserve University, and to our founding co-sponsors UN Global Compact PRME and the Globally Responsible Leadership Initiative (GRLI).

In September 2016, AIM2Flourish was named as the student engagement platform partner for the UN Global Compact’s new Global Solutions Platform of business solutions for the SDGs.

Selection Criteria

AIM2Flourish stories are about business innovations from for-profit companies (including B Corps) that help achieve one or more of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), such as ending poverty and ensuring peace and justice. Furthermore, we are looking for examples of business innovations that increase economic prosperity while contributing to a healthy world and human wellbeing.

UN Global Goals for Sustainable Development

All AIM2Flourish stories that are on the AIM2Flourish.com website by Decem

ber 31, 2016 are eligible nominations for the inaugural Flourish Prizes, to be awarded at the Fourth Global Forum in June 2017. We will honor the business leader for their innovation as well as the student author(s) and professor.

Every AIM2Flourish story is reviewed by one of our AIM2Flourish Story Stewards, a dedicated volunteer team that includes award-winning journalists, media makers, management coaches, and professors. The final selections for the Flourish Prizes will be made by a distinguished panel of business leaders and scholars.

Celebration and Recognition

We’ll celebrate the best-of-the-best business innovation stories in June 2017 at the 4th Global Forum. AIM2Flourish is an unparalleled opportunity to dynamically connect students, business leaders, management schools, media makers, and investors across geographies, generations, and industries. We will help business leaders, students, and professors share their innovation stories’ impact, accelerate their contributions, and inspire others with their examples.

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Civil Society Statement at the High Level Political Forum #HLPF http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29158 Fri, 21 Jul 2017 12:04:18 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29158 Spaces for dialogue remain too limited. At the 2017 High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development almost 2,500 representatives from civil society around the world.  This is a clear sign of the engagement and commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals on the part of civil society. Action for Sustainable Development]]>

Spaces for dialogue remain too limited. At the 2017 High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development almost 2,500 representatives from civil society around the world.  This is a clear sign of the engagement and commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals on the part of civil society. Action for Sustainable Development provided this summary statement as a response to the Ministerial Declaration.

Civil Society Statement at the High Level Political Forum – Response to the Ministerial Declaration

The 2017 High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 10-19 July 2017 counted with the participation of almost 2,500 representatives from civil society around the world, an increase of 1,000 from 2016. This is a clear sign of the engagement and commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals on the part of civil society. Action for Sustainable Development includes over 1,700 members in over 150 countries who share a clear enthusiasm and determination to make a strong contribution to this agenda and to share our expertise with decision-makers. However we are concerned that the spaces for dialogue remain too limited.

1) Responding to the 2017 theme: “Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world”

The theme of this year’s HLPF recognises the central need for poverty eradication as a vital step to guarantee a sustainable future for all. We note the reference to ‘transformative efforts’ and the need to reach those furthest behind first.

Although we welcome the stated aim of UN member states to end poverty and combat inequalities, we remain concerned that what has been presented in Voluntary National Reviews this year demonstrates that the pace of change is still too slow, and the reality remains that the scale of inequality globally is rising. Information provided by civil society groups, through their Civil Society Reports also indicates that wealth concentration is continuing at a ferocious pace, while economic weakness is met with even greater ‘austerity’ by governments.

These are universal challenges. Governments in North and South continue to reduce investment in public services, accelerating the process of dismantling social protection and labor legislation, with long-term underfunding of essential health, education, gender, innovation and environmental programs. Simultaneously there are increasing investments in the private sector and reductions in corporate taxation. If these worrying trends remain unaddressed, they will undermine the universal commitment to eradicate poverty, and will instead contribute to its exacerbation.

2) The central role of peaceful, just and inclusive societies

Action for Sustainable Development notes the reference to the importance of peaceful, just and inclusive societies in the Ministerial Declaration, in particular the need for good governance and the effective rule of law. It is our view that shared principles of freedom of assembly and association, coupled with freedom of expression provide the underlying bedrock for healthy inclusive societies. Member States must recognise that we will not realize the targets in Agenda 2030 if communities continue to be excluded from decision-making processes.

In this context the degree of openness of civic space in the countries under review at the HLPF 2017 is also concerning. In 2017, of 44 countries under review, only 10 are considered ‘open’, while a further 12 are perceived as ‘narrowed’, including Italy, Slovenia, Japan, Chile and India. What is most concerning is that the other half of countries under review are evaluated to be ‘obstructed’ including Brazil and Kenya; ‘repressed’ including Zimbabwe and Bangladesh; or ‘closed’, including Belarus and Azerbaijan (see HLPF index).

It is particularly concerning to witness the rise of national populist tendencies in traditional democracies, such as the US, and UK, where leaders are perceived to be inflaming an already difficult situation for minorities, through the use of language which contributes to their exclusion. While at the same time many newer democracies are also backsliding on key indicators of good governance. This analysis suggests that the commitment to open inclusive societies is not felt on the ground in a wide range of countries and that there is an urgent need for governments to work in partnership with other stakeholders to ensure that this commitment, which they agreed, is delivered in practice.

3) National level implementation of the Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs)

Now, in the second year of implementation of Agenda 2030, it is critically important to ensure that the HLPF VNR process provides a real mechanism for accountability of the delivery by member state of their commitments, including meaningful engagement with citizens. The HLPF has the potential to be a much needed moment for reflection, review, in order to identify good practice and jointly address challenges.

In order to understand how far the review process has engaged citizens and civil society, we have carried out national reports in 20 of the 44 VNR countries on the participation of civil society in the reviews , there are several notable trends:

At least 10 countries have established high level governmental committees or parliamentary groups to lead the delivery of Agenda 2030
In a few cases there is still a lack of specific implementation plans
In many cases although there is a sense that the SDGs are included in existing national plans, the ‘transformational’ aspect of the agenda has been significantly diluted or lost
Reporting on the inter-connected dimension of the agenda and its synergies across different thematic areas is limited due to budget constraints- each government department has a limited remit. Intersectionality, climate change and the pledge to leave no one behind, are the areas that have the most potential for transformational change but are inadequately represented in the reports.
The local level of government is still not very aware or engaged with Agenda 2030
Engagement with civil society and broader stakeholders remains patchy

We also would like to stress that the implementation of the SDGs should be part of an integrated approach with the Paris Climate Agreement. One of the tools which could promote an integrated implementation approach is precisely national reporting. We urge member states to do their best to include climate change in their planning, delivery and consequently in the formulation of their Voluntary National Reviews.

It is vital that governments consider different climate scenarios and how these might impact on the delivery of the SDGs. Reflecting the agreement to implement the goals as a whole package, member states need to identify how climate change intersects with the pledge to Leave No One Behind, for example by identifying which groups are most vulnerable to climate impacts and how this relates to issues of marginalisation and discrimination.

4) Role of the United Nations

We note that the UN is providing an increasing amount of information and documentation on the UN DESA HLPF website, which provides a useful entry point for engagement. However we are very concerned that there is still no space to feature the national Civil Society Reports on the UN website.

It is essential for UN country level teams to engage more directly in ensuring specific national plans are delivered which provide support to citizens, particularly those who have been left behind. It is clear that more work should be done by the UNDP and other delivery agencies to contribute towards ensuring that SDG implementation is delivered in an inclusive way and that they are able to work with civil society and key stakeholders at a national level to drive a truly transformational agenda.

We would welcome a full response on the UN’s position and its expectation relating to citizen and civil society participation in the implementation and reporting.

5) Role and capacities of civil society

Our country reports, demonstrate that civil society is mobilising. There are a number of active national coalitions of civil society around the world, such as in Kenya, Brazil, India, Nepal, including in so-called ‘developed’ countries such as Italy, Sweden and Japan, which have been very active in working together to ensure all voices are heard at the national level and to enable a broad inclusive process of dialogue.

However, the opportunities for engagement for CSOs are still limited, even though Agenda 2030 foresees meaningful participation of civil society. We therefore urge Member States and the United Nations to take the following recommendations into account:

To ensure the success of Agenda 2030, civil society’s role in monitoring and implementation of the agenda must be more than just an informal one.
CSOs must be given access to formal roles, guaranteeing their participation in

clear consultation processes on government implementation plans and measures
formal representation mechanisms which oversee implementation efforts
channels for participation in accountability processes, amongst others

The international community should support and fully resource a coordinated approach to the capacity development of civil society to enable implementation and effective monitoring of the Agenda across the globe.

Finally, we reaffirm our call for the development and adequate resourcing of structured and meaningful engagement of CSOs, in Agenda 2030 implementation and monitoring at all levels.

About Action for Sustainable Development

Action for Sustainable Development is a civil society platform with over 1,700 members in over 150 countries, we work collaboratively to create space and facilitate citizens and civil society organisations at local, national, regional and global levels to organise, mobilise, advocate and act collectively in pursuit of sustainable development.

We came together to inspire and to commit to actions that empower all peoples, especially those who have been marginalised, and in order to collectively tackle the root causes of inequalities, injustice, human rights violations, poverty, environmental degradation and climate change. We seek to be part of creating a world where social, environmental and development justice is assured and all people are able to live in a prosperous, healthy, secure and peaceful environment.

Karsten Weitzenegger supports Action for Sustainable Development. More: http://action4sd.org/tools-resources/

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‘Paris: our values, our future’ | CdM statement on Trump and climate change http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29139 Fri, 16 Jun 2017 07:51:03 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29139 Karsten Weitzenegger has signed the follwoing Statement ‘Paris: our values, our future’ by  Club de Madrid leaders. We regret Trump’s decision of pulling out from the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. Former Presidents and Primer Ministers, plus experts and CdM advisors, call upon every signatory to show urgency and commitment in]]>

Karsten Weitzenegger has signed the follwoing Statement ‘Paris: our values, our future’ by  Club de Madrid leaders. We regret Trump’s decision of pulling out from the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. Former Presidents and Primer Ministers, plus experts and CdM advisors, call upon every signatory to show urgency and commitment in the fight against global warming.

 

PARIS, OUR VALUES, OUR FUTURE

 

Climate Change is an undeniable reality affecting the planet and humankind. It is an existential threat. For over a decade, the Club de Madrid and its more than 100 Members have been vigorously advocating for an ambitious, effective and fair global climate regime. President Trump’s decision to withdraw the U.S. from the landmark 2015 Paris Climate Agreement has left us and many around the world baffled and concerned, not only about the future of global climate and environmental policy, but also about the impact that this decision may have on international relations moving forward.
The 2015 Paris Agreement was a historical, forward looking milestone, in process and responsibility. Intense negotiations brought 195 nations to agree to voluntarily tackle climate change. Relinquishing the U.S. responsibility and role in the new, global climate regime, as well as in the revolutionary clean energy transition resulting from it, is not only likely to affect the attainment of the Paris Agreement goals, it will open up a geopolitical vacuum with unpredictable and possibly regrettable consequence.
We deeply regret the Trump Administration’s decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement. In spite of the U.S. withdrawal, we shall forcefully and enthusiastically persist with the line of action launched 10 years ago with our Global Leadership for Climate Action Initiative. We shall strengthen and endeavor to mobilize political will in countries, cities, business and among citizens for far-reaching and effective action to meet the Paris commitments to prevent catastrophic climate change.
Climate change is not just an environmental issue. Climate actions are certainly not preventing the US ‘from conducting its internal economic affairs’ or imposing draconian financial and economic burdens’’ or massive future legal liability’ on the US ‘while imposing no meaningful obligations on the world’s leading polluters’. The Paris Agreement, in fact, opens up an opportunity to expand market options for all. Already in 2007, the McKinsey Global Institute highlighted opportunities for efficiency gains, shifts to lower-carbon energy sources, and expanded carbon sinks with initial capital costs completely offset by savings in future energy costs. They noted that “concerted efforts to reduce GHG emissions would…stimulate economic forces and create business opportunities that we cannot foresee today and that may accelerate the rate of abatement…, thereby reducing the overall cost.” Ten years later, there is even greater consensus on this.
As former democratic Presidents and Prime Ministers from around the globe, we call upon each and every other signatory of the Paris Agreement to show greater urgency and commitment in the fight against global warming and bolster their support of the Paris Accord.  We welcome the bold and firm determination of many states, cities, counties and companies in the U.S. to pursue ambitious policies to address climate change and support the transition to a cleaner energy system. We encourage other subnational entities to follow suit stand ready to engage with stakeholders in the US to bring light to the real issue at hand. It is time to speak truth to power and to advance on a positive, constructive and saner path in every family, community and nation. Climate change must remain paramount on the global agenda and truth must prevail in the end, for the sake of our planet and the future of mankind.
Likewise, we urge all stakeholders to further and strengthen trust between the North and the South and establish an equitable basis and new modalities for genuine international cooperation in addressing the challenges of energy and climate security.

Climate Change is much more than just facts, figures and degrees. This is about our values and our future. The Paris Agreement must be a commitment that becomes reality for the sake of our planet and that of future generations.

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Understanding the Dimensions of Sustainable Development – UNSSC video http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29132 Fri, 02 Jun 2017 12:55:53 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29132 Understanding the Dimensions of Sustainable Development from UNSSC on Vimeo. The United Nations System Staff College (UNSSC) has launched its first explainer video that introduces the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).]]>

Understanding the Dimensions of Sustainable Development from UNSSC on Vimeo.

The United Nations System Staff College (UNSSC) has launched its first explainer video that introduces the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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World’s most marginalized still left behind by global development priorities http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29081 Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:04:25 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29081 Millions of people are not benefiting from progress, with the gap set to widen unless deep-rooted development barriers, including discrimination and unequal political participation, are tackled. These are the findings of the Human Development Report 2016, entitled ‘Human Development for Everyone’, released today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).]]>

Millions of people are not benefiting from progress, with the gap set to widen unless deep-rooted development barriers, including discrimination and unequal political participation, are tackled. These are the findings of the Human Development Report 2016, entitled ‘Human Development for Everyone’, released today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Stockholm, 21 March 2017 (UNDP) A quarter-century of impressive human development progress continues to leave many people behind, with systemic, often unmeasured, barriers to catching up. A stronger focus on those excluded and on actions to dismantle these barriers is urgently needed to ensure sustainable human development for all.

In past decades, there has been significant gains in human development levels in almost every country; but millions of people have not benefited from this progress. Who has been left behind and why? The Human Development Report 2016 ’Human Development for Everyone’ looks into these two questions. It identifies recognizes that in every society certain groups are far more likely to suffer disadvantages than others and identifies deep-rooted, and often unmeasured, barriers to development.

The report also looks to what societies should do to advance human development for everyone. It sets forward policy recommendations at the national level and also looks at ways in which the global development landscape could be made more effective in the fight to leave no one behind and achieve the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

It is time to face up to deep-rooted barriers to development

“By eliminating deep, persistent, discriminatory social norms and laws, and addressing the unequal access to political participation, which have hindered progress for so many, poverty can be eradicated and a peaceful, just, and sustainable development can be achieved for all,” Helen Clark said. Marginalized groups often have limited opportunities to influence the institutions and policies that
determine their lives. Changing this is central to breaking the vicious circle of exclusion and deprivation.

For example, indigenous peoples account for five percent of the world’s population, but 15 percent of people living in poverty. And members of the LGBTI community cannot actively advocate for their rights when same-sex acts between men are illegal in more than 70 countries. The report calls for far greater attention to empowering the most marginalized in society, and recognizes the importance of giving them greater voice in decision-making processes.

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Karsten Weitzenegger joins Action4SD http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29004 Tue, 06 Dec 2016 09:11:42 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29004 Karsten Weitzenegger supports ACTION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT http://action4sd.org and calls civil society organisations to become members of this global platform. From the Mission Statement We see the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change as opportunities to move towards such transformation. If these commitments are]]>

Logo.Action4SDKarsten Weitzenegger supports ACTION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT http://action4sd.org and calls civil society organisations to become members of this global platform.

From the Mission Statement

We see the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change as opportunities to move towards such transformation. If these commitments are met, we have a chance of saving the planet and delivering just outcomes for all people. This agenda is the responsibility of us all, not just those we put into political office . The sustainable development agenda is a social contract between the people and public authorities. Democratic and participatory processes where people are able to effectively contribute are critical to achieving this agenda. We come together to inspire and to commit to actions that empower all peoples, especially those who have been marginalised, and in order to collectively tackle the root causes of inequalities, injustice, human rights violations, poverty, environmental degradation and climate change.

We want a world where social, environmental and development justice is assured and all people are able to live in a prosperous, healthy, secure and peaceful environment. We urgently need a world where everyone is able to equally and freely participate and influence the decisions that affect their lives and hold governments, international institutions, private sector and other stakeholders to account. We want an inclusive society where everyone has the right to express themselves in a way that their voices are heard , respected and can directly shape the decision-making process . Our vision is a transformational shift that ensures gender justice and equality, enabling everyone to live their lives in dignity, free from hunger and from the fear of violence, oppression, discrimination or injustice – including due to gender identity or sexual orientation – in a way that protects the planetary systems required to sustain all life on earth.

We want to see a world where a phrase like ‘leave no one behind’ actually delivers for those who are at risk of marginalisation. We will strive to combat inequalities of all forms, between and within countries. We commit to take actions that are accountable and responsive to local needs. We want a new global approach where the economic and financial systems are an instrument to deliver wellbeing for all. This implies an economic model that is not based on debts; where trade is not an objective on its own, but a way to distribute goods and services equitably; where labour standards and limits of planetary boundaries are respected; where local and regional trade, small and medium social enterprises and cooperatives are supported to achieve sustainable consumption and production.
An economic approach where the global trading system is just, people-responsive and where developing countries have the right to develop according to their own models.

We further call for a holistic approach that recognises the balance of economic, natural and social rights, as set out by traditional and indigenous wisdoms. We also need a financial system which supports and does not contradict sustainable development. Fair financial mechanisms and investments are crucial and we will push for robust implementation of commitments made, including the Financing for Sustainable Development process.

We come together to support each other in achieving this world we urgently need

Current areas of work are:

  1. Policy & Advocacy. We will analyse and ask tough questions where we see problems, risks and shortcomings; we will work in a coordinated way to push power-holders to deliver better outcomes for people and planet.
  2. Monitoring & Accountability. We will actively monitor implementation of the agreed agenda and invest in the capacity and agency of civil society to monitor progress on sustainable development.
  3. Innovative solutions. We will showcase examples of how civil society is itself delivering on the sustainable development agenda, not just to highlight best practice and innovation, but also to hold ourselves accountable. We will share inspiring ideas and resources tomake sure that alternative solutions are grounded in local needs.
  4. Public mobilisation. Recognising that this should be a People’s Agenda, we will work to familiarise the public with sustainable development and the commitments made by governments, in order to promote people- powered accountability and support the mobilisation of people. We will organise solidarity actions with people working for sustainable development and cooperate with others to build a people’s movement.

Latest Activities

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How to Finance a Sustainable World Economy http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28926 Wed, 20 Jul 2016 13:18:09 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28926 Berlin, 07/20/2016 – Banks and insurers can play a crucial part in stabilizing the climate, while at the same time safeguarding their clients’ assets. Leading representatives of finance and climate research will discuss the best strategies for a turnaround in investing this Thursday in Berlin. The event is hosted by the Swiss global bank UBS, the French multinational insurance firm AXA, CDP, the European innovation initiative Climate-KIC, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Divestment – the diversion of capital from fossil fuel industries to green innovation and sustainable businesses – is a new approach to reducing greenhouse-gas emissions, which could turn out to be a global “game changer”.

The Great Investment Turnaround: how to finance a sustainable world economy

Already today, investments of billions of Euros are being redirected. Pioneered by students of wealthy US universities, divestment has reached financial big shots like Allianz by now: the financial services company announced its intention to divest from its assets in coal mining. The foundation of the legendary US oil dynasty Rockefeller plans to divest their funds from the fossil fuel industry as well.

“The risks of climate change affect everyone and everything. When the finance sector now divests billions from the fossil business, this does not only reflect a moral responsibility but also makes good business sense,” says PIK director Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, co-initiator of the conference. “While weather extremes increase already, many of the biggest climate impacts, like the consequences of sea-level rise, will become perceptible only after it would be too late to act. Therefore it is important for the finance sector to recognize the warnings of science and to ramp up sustainable investments as soon as possible. The Paris Agreement substantiates that the nations of the world aim at reaching zero emissions by 2050. This means we are now in year one of the Great Transformation. Whoever still invests in coal and oil will not only damage the environment, but eventually also lose a lot of money.”

“Recognize the possible economic and social impacts of climate change”

„As a global bank it is of major importance to recognize the possible economic and social impacts of climate change, in order to better prepare us and our clients,” says Axel Weber, Chairman of the Board of Directors of UBS Group AG. “The financial sector is working hard to lay the foundations for filling gaps in financing climate action and to support nations in delivering on their corresponding commitments. We aim for a sensible long-term allocation of capital that is congruent with a low-carbon economy.”

Christian Thimann, Global Head of Strategy, Sustainability, and Public Affairs at AXA Group and Vice-Chair of the FSB Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure, says: “Finance has an important role in addressing climate change, because it steers long-term investment. Investors need to understand how companies address climate change in their strategies, which goes well beyond the current carbon footprint. Under the mandate of the G20 and the Financial Stability Board, the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure seeks to develop consistent voluntary disclosures by companies and enhance investor understanding of climate-related business risks and opportunities. Such disclosures and better investor understanding will foster implementation of the COP21 agreement.”

„Divestment is one of the most potent signals of investor discontent”

Susan Dreyer, CDP Country Director Germany, Austria, Switzerland adds: „Divestment is one of the most potent signals of investor discontent and can be a valuable method to manage portfolio risk, given climate risks are becoming more urgent every day. Having built a platform for transparent and comparable climate strategies, into which 5600 companies worldwide are voluntary reporting today, CDP knows of the impact investor engagement can unfold. Shareholder resolutions or setting joint reduction targets are good examples. And yet, the clear signal from both civil society and investors that fossil based business models do not have a future in the decarbonized world of 2050, is helpful and needed.”

Among the distinguished speakers are also Rainer Baake, State Secretary at the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, Laurence Tubiana, French Ambassador for international climate negotiations at COP 21, Monsignor Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo, Chancellor of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and high-ranking finance representatives, from the major bank HSBC to Union Investment, from the central bank of the Netherlands to the French Ministry of Finance.

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WTO and UNCTAD commit to further help poor countries integrate into the global economy http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28746 Wed, 14 Oct 2015 11:30:20 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28746 Geneva, 12 October 2015 (UNCTAD) – The World Trade Organization (WTO) and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) have pledged to work together towards the integration of developing countries, especially the least-developed among them, into the world economy and the multilateral trading system. WTO Director-General Roberto Azevêdo,]]>

Geneva, 12 October 2015 (UNCTAD) – The World Trade Organization (WTO) and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) have pledged to work together towards the integration of developing countries, especially the least-developed among them, into the world economy and the multilateral trading system.

WTO Director-General Roberto Azevêdo, and UNCTAD Secretary-General Mukhisa Kituyi signed a joint declaration, as they marked the twentieth anniversary of the WTO at its headquarters in Geneva on 12 October. The agreement further strengthens the collaboration between the UNCTAD and WTO in key areas of their work, and builds on Memoranda of Understanding signed by the organizations in 2003 and 2013.

UNCTAD and the WTO believe that trade should play a key role in supporting the implementation of the outcomes of the Third International Conference of Financing for Development, in the achievement of the global Sustainable Development Goals and, above all, in fostering inclusive economic growth for poverty alleviation.

The organizations plan to reinforce their cooperation on issues such as trade related-technical assistance, trade facilitation, trade and investment, debt and finance, global value chains, commodities, standards, non-tariff measures, and e-commerce, as well as the establishment of a Geneva Trade Statistics Hub.

Dr. Kituyi said: “The signing of this declaration will deepen our collaboration in helping the least developed countries. As we celebrate twenty years of achievement, we recognize that many least developed countries are still commodity dependent, which therefore exposes them to the vulnerabilities of the boom and bust cycle.”

Mr. Azevêdo said: “Our organizations share a common goal of helping developing countries, and especially the least-developed countries, integrate into the global economy. This declaration reaffirms and strengthens the collaboration of our two organisations to keep on promoting trade as a tool for development.”

After the signing ceremony, Dr. Kituyi and Mr. Azevêdo jointly opened the event Twenty years of supporting the integration of least developed countries into the multilateral trading system (https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/devel_e/ldcwtoat20-121015_e.htm) which looked at the key developments and decisions taken in favour of the 48 least developed countries (LDCs), the institutional support provided and the trade capacity-building initiatives put in place. Participants also discussed how the international community could help the LDCs better integrate into the multilateral trading system.

Background

UNCTAD was formed in 1964 to help poor countries adopt policies that would integrate them into the world economy and boost prosperity. UNCTAD is based at the United Nations Office at Geneva, Switzerland, and has representative offices at the United Nations in New York and in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. It works at the behest of 194 member States and employs 500 people.
The WTO deals with the global rules of trade between nations. Among its main functions, it ensures that trade flows as smoothly, predictably and freely as possible.

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Amina J. Mohammed: “It is time for a sustainable development agenda” http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28654 Fri, 14 Aug 2015 14:40:30 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28654 The UN Special Adviser on Post-2015 Development Planning explains why the sustainable development agenda is inclusive, timely and imperative.

“This is an agenda about investing, it’s not charity. It’s in everyone’s interest.” Amina J. Mohammed
“We are better investing now, because we won’t be able to afford t later.” Amina J. Mohammed

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