Development Results – weitzenegger.de http://www.weitzenegger.de/content Sustainable Development Solutions Thu, 08 Mar 2018 20:33:59 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 https://i0.wp.com/www.weitzenegger.de/content/wp-content/uploads/kwlogoSDG100.gif?fit=32%2C32 Development Results – weitzenegger.de http://www.weitzenegger.de/content 32 32 36945952 #CrossroadsBonn Conference explores connections between climate change and a just world http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30073 Fri, 03 Nov 2017 11:55:20 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=30073 A ten-point memorandum entitled “The Climate – Justice – Cooperation Nexus: 10 Cornerstones of the Great Transformation towards Sustainability” was presented as the outcome of the conference. This memorandum defines key global challenges for the coming years and calls upon state and non-governmental actors to accelerate their efforts to tackle]]>

A ten-point memorandum entitled “The Climate – Justice – Cooperation Nexus: 10 Cornerstones of the Great Transformation towards Sustainability” was presented as the outcome of the conference. This memorandum defines key global challenges for the coming years and calls upon state and non-governmental actors to accelerate their efforts to tackle climate change.

Human wellbeing, peace, security, and the stability of the Earth system are at a crossroads

At this year’s climate conference in Bonn the world finds itself at a crossroads. The talks will no longer be about a mere reduction of greenhouse gases, but will have to discuss a socially responsible decarbonisation of the world economy and a new dynamic of global cooperation in the face of nationalism and xenophobia.

On Monday, 6 November, the highly anticipated 2017 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP23) starts in Bonn. Just before the summit opens its doors for delegates and guests from around the world, the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) are hosting a two-day dialogue conference (http://www.crossroadsbonn.org) back-to-back with COP23 bringing together politics, economy, civil society, academia, artists and the media.

The #CrossroadsBonn Conference was held on 4-5 November 2017 in Bonn, back to back with COP23. We need a new culture of global cooperation, substantiated by mutual respect and support, to make the transformation towards sustainability a reality. This is the main message we want to develop and feed into the climate negotiations.

Karsten Weitzenegger takes part for SID to cover the topics from a practitioner’s viewpoint in search for applicable sustainable development solutions.

Humanity has a clear choice: Will we let this unique opportunity for a global transformation towards sustainability slip through our hands, or will we take action towards ensuring a future in which we live within our planetary boundaries?

Some Weblinks on the Climate Conference in Bonn

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Solutions Summit 2017 highlights projects that advance the objectives of one or more of the 17 SDGs http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29997 Wed, 13 Sep 2017 10:17:20 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29997 Solutions selected for SOLUTIONS SUMMIT 2017 Solutions Summit is an annual catalytic gathering at United Nations Headquarters in New York during UN General Assembly high-level week in September. This initiative lifts-up and advances the work of exceptional teams already developing innovative solutions that address the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This]]>
Solutions selected for SOLUTIONS SUMMIT 2017
Solutions Summit is an annual catalytic gathering at United Nations Headquarters in New York during UN General Assembly high-level week in September. This initiative lifts-up and advances the work of exceptional teams already developing innovative solutions that address the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
This year’s Solutions Summit will take place from 19-21 September from 12:00-1:00pm each day in the UN SDG Media Zone – a live broadcast event space at the United Nations focused on the SDGs – and will involve in-person accelerator sessions and social media interaction with the selected solution-makers.
WHO IS ORGANIZING THE EFFORT?
The Solutions Summit is led by the UN Foundation, UN-NGLS, shift7, and the Global Innovation Exchange. UN-NGLS coordinated the open and transparent application and selection process to curate solutions to be featured during the Solutions Summit, involving a Selection Committee of 25 top innovators and technologists from around the world.
SOLUTIONS SELECTED
The Selection Committee agreed a short-list of 35 solutions from 535 applications received, and the Solutions Summit lead organizers selected the following 11 extraordinary solution-makers:
The leaders of these projects – a regionally and gender balanced group – will each give a ‘lightning talk’ outlining their breakthrough efforts at United Nations Headquarters on 19-21 September.
MORE INFORMATION
For more information, please visit: http://solutions-summit.org
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World’s most marginalized still left behind by global development priorities http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29081 Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:04:25 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=29081 Millions of people are not benefiting from progress, with the gap set to widen unless deep-rooted development barriers, including discrimination and unequal political participation, are tackled. These are the findings of the Human Development Report 2016, entitled ‘Human Development for Everyone’, released today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).]]>

Millions of people are not benefiting from progress, with the gap set to widen unless deep-rooted development barriers, including discrimination and unequal political participation, are tackled. These are the findings of the Human Development Report 2016, entitled ‘Human Development for Everyone’, released today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Stockholm, 21 March 2017 (UNDP) A quarter-century of impressive human development progress continues to leave many people behind, with systemic, often unmeasured, barriers to catching up. A stronger focus on those excluded and on actions to dismantle these barriers is urgently needed to ensure sustainable human development for all.

In past decades, there has been significant gains in human development levels in almost every country; but millions of people have not benefited from this progress. Who has been left behind and why? The Human Development Report 2016 ’Human Development for Everyone’ looks into these two questions. It identifies recognizes that in every society certain groups are far more likely to suffer disadvantages than others and identifies deep-rooted, and often unmeasured, barriers to development.

The report also looks to what societies should do to advance human development for everyone. It sets forward policy recommendations at the national level and also looks at ways in which the global development landscape could be made more effective in the fight to leave no one behind and achieve the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

It is time to face up to deep-rooted barriers to development

“By eliminating deep, persistent, discriminatory social norms and laws, and addressing the unequal access to political participation, which have hindered progress for so many, poverty can be eradicated and a peaceful, just, and sustainable development can be achieved for all,” Helen Clark said. Marginalized groups often have limited opportunities to influence the institutions and policies that
determine their lives. Changing this is central to breaking the vicious circle of exclusion and deprivation.

For example, indigenous peoples account for five percent of the world’s population, but 15 percent of people living in poverty. And members of the LGBTI community cannot actively advocate for their rights when same-sex acts between men are illegal in more than 70 countries. The report calls for far greater attention to empowering the most marginalized in society, and recognizes the importance of giving them greater voice in decision-making processes.

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ILO calls for reorientation of Latin American labour market policies http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28858 Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:30:32 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28858 ILO: Labour market policies in Latin America must be reoriented to protect social achievements and address productivity gaps At a time when governments in the region face the dual challenges of creating quality jobs and safeguarding achievements in social inclusion and work quality, an ILO report highlights the need for]]>

ILO: Labour market policies in Latin America must be reoriented to protect social achievements and address productivity gaps

At a time when governments in the region face the dual challenges of creating quality jobs and safeguarding achievements in social inclusion and work quality, an ILO report highlights the need for a new approach based on active labour market policies to address the current economic slowdown.

Lima, 21 June 2016 (ILO) – The International Labour Organization (ILO) has urged Latin American countries to carry out a “strategic reorientation” of their labour market policies in order to increase productivity and to address rising unemployment and informality resulting from the economic slowdown.

The report in Spanish

A report warns that “the achievements made since the 2000s, in terms of social inclusion and work quality have stalled and are even beginning to reverse,” which can lead to a dangerous “structural stagnation” in labour markets that could, in turn, generate an increase in inequality and informality and erosion in the middle class”.

“The alarm bells are ringing, the economic slowdown will impact the region’s labour markets in 2016 and over the next years,” said the ILO’s Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, José Manuel Salazar.

“Now what we are talking about are effective solutions. The so-called active labour market policies represent a policy shift that seeks to improve and update the skills of the labour force, readjust labour supply and demand, and promote productive employment. This integrated approach is what labour markets in the region need,” he added.

The report, “What works: Active labour market policies in Latin American and the Caribbean ”, was developed by the ILO’s Research Department in Geneva.

According to the document, despite some years of solid growth in which social progress and unemployment advanced, those achievements were not consolidated, thus revealing structural deficiencies. The report warns that “even with remarkable progress, the shift to a knowledge driven economy and one based on better quality jobs has not been completed”.

ILO specialist Veronica Escudero, one of the authors of the report, warned that “even if these policies have great potential, we need to highlight that the design, targeting and implementation are essential to guarantee their effectiveness.”

In this sense, it is necessary to “be very clear about the employment barriers that people in a country face, as well as the needs of the local labour market, to ensure the relevance of the policies and to maximize their impact, including the number of beneficiaries,” explained Escudero.

An urgent policy reorientation for Latin America and the Caribbean

To tackle unemployment, informality and low productivity growth, a policy reorientation is needed in Latin America and the Caribbean. ILO economists Clemente Pignatti and Verónica Escudero discuss the potential opportunities that can be leveraged from active labour market policies in the region.

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Cash Transfer Programs Succeed for Zambia’s Poor, Offer Lessons for Battling African Poverty, AIR Finds http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28832 Wed, 08 Jun 2016 07:55:19 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28832 African nations increasingly embrace cash transfers to combat the continent’s cycle of poverty WASHINGTON D.C., United States of America, June 8, 2016/ — Programs designed to alleviate hunger and increase food supply through cash transfers to some of Zambia’s poorest families achieved those goals and more, final evaluations conducted by]]>
African nations increasingly embrace cash transfers to combat the continent’s cycle of poverty
WASHINGTON D.C., United States of America, June 8, 2016/ — Programs designed to alleviate hunger and increase food supply through cash transfers to some of Zambia’s poorest families achieved those goals and more, final evaluations conducted by the American Institutes for Research (AIR) (http://www.AIR.org) revealed.

Overall, researchers found that a cash-transfer program geared toward families with at least one young child had effects that amounted to a net benefit of 1.5 kwacha—Zambia’s currency— for each kwacha transferred. A second program for households with fewer able-bodied people to farm had effects that amounted to a net benefit of 1.68 kwacha for each kwacha transferred.

Besides eating more meals and building more reliable food reserves, families used the money to improve their housing, buy additional necessities for their children, acquire more livestock and reduce debt.

The studies, commissioned by UNICEF, are likely to be closely watched as African nations increasingly embrace cash transfers to combat the continent’s cycle of poverty. South Africa’s program is the largest, with roughly 16.1 million people—about a third of its population—receiving some kind of social grant.

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Notably, the two Zambian programs were unconditional—providing small, consistent sums of money with no strings attached on how they were spent. The programs bucked general criticisms that cash transfers spark dependency. Rather, the discretionary approach empowered families, who used the grants to improve their living standards in ways that made sense given their individual circumstances. At no point during the multiyear grants did alcohol consumption increase. Nor was there any impact on fertility, according to the evaluations.

“The unconditional approach worked,” said Stanfield Michelo, director of social welfare at Zambia’s Ministry of Community Development and Social Welfare. “And because it did, the region is making positive strides. Without a doubt, the changes would not have been possible without AIR’s rigorous evaluations.”

The evaluation of the Child Grant cash-transfer program (CGP) lasted four years, and the evaluation of the Multiple Category Targeting Grant (MCTG) lasted three years. Begun in 2010 in three of Zambia’s poorest districts, the CGP was open to all households with at least one child under age 4. Half were randomly assigned to receive cash transfers of 60 kwacha ($12) a month, and half to a control group that did not receive funds. The MCTG was aimed at poor households with fewer able-bodied people to farm, due largely to a “missing generation” of parents in their 30s and 40s and disproportionally high numbers of adolescents and orphans cared for by widows and grandparents. As with the CGP, half the MCTG participants received the equivalent of $12 a month and half were in a control group that didn’t.

The studies were notable not only for their duration, but also for their use of randomization and control groups to tease out the program’s true effects.

“Few evaluations of cash transfer programs can make such strong causal claims with as much certainty as these two evaluations,” said David Seidenfeld (http://www.air.org/person/david-seidenfeld), AIR’s senior director of international research and evaluation and lead study author. “The design of the study, which extended over several years, allowed us to see that the beneficiaries do not grow complacent over time, but instead find ways to grow the value of the transfer beyond benefits related to food security and consumption.”

Although the studies revealed persistent successes, they also offered future researchers and policymakers an idea of cash transfers’ limitations. The studies did not show consistent successes in education or child nutrition, possibly due to large-scale infrastructure issues—namely, the supply of social services, access to clean water, and a lack of health care and education facilities.

Among the studies’ principal lessons, researchers found that the degree of positive impact depended largely on the participants’ characteristics. For example, the multiple-category grants had large impacts on schooling because participating households had more school-age children. Overall, school enrollment jumps of 8 percent for children ages 11–14 and 11 percent for children 15–17 were attributed to the program, and these age groups are at the greatest risk of dropping out in Zambia, according to the report. By contrast, four years into the program, the child grants had no enrollment or attendance impacts for children in three groups: ages 4–7, 8–10 and 15–17.

“Another lesson is that the unconditional nature of the grants gave participants the flexibility to use the money to combat principal life challenges,” said UNICEF Zambia Representative Hamid El-Bashir Ibrahim. “For example, the CGP significantly affected many indicators commonly associated with resiliency—the ability to manage and withstand shocks. Households with transfers significantly improved housing quality and tools, livestock procurement, and opportunities to diversify income-generating activities so they could better withstand emergencies.”

“The overall results demonstrate unequivocally that common perceptions about cash transfers—that they are handouts and cause dependency, or lead to alcohol and tobacco consumption, or increases in pregnancy—are not true in Zambia,” Seidenfeld said. “Quite the contrary. Due to the unconditional nature of the grants, households had the flexibility needed to meet their most pressing challenges head on.”

The final reports on the Child Grant cash transfer program (http://bit.ly/25KDdJk) and the Multiple Category Transfer Grant program (http://bit.ly/1Udb21M) can be found on AIR’s website. The site also features a video (http://bit.ly/1TXR5Oe) of David Seidenfeld discussing lessons learned from the multiyear studies.

Source: APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of American Institutes for Research (AIR).

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Amina J. Mohammed: “It is time for a sustainable development agenda” http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28654 Fri, 14 Aug 2015 14:40:30 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28654 The UN Special Adviser on Post-2015 Development Planning explains why the sustainable development agenda is inclusive, timely and imperative.

“This is an agenda about investing, it’s not charity. It’s in everyone’s interest.” Amina J. Mohammed
“We are better investing now, because we won’t be able to afford t later.” Amina J. Mohammed

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Global Daily – Free service for global citizens to find the latest news on #globalgoals and sustainable development http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28613 Sun, 31 May 2015 12:50:14 +0000 http://www.weitzenegger.de/content/?p=28613 Global Daily – Your world. Your issues. Your news.

Global Daily brings you the most important news and resources about the Sustainable Development Goals from around the world.

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The Sustainable Development Goals: a set of global targets that will be used to shape international development over the next 15 years.

Global Daily is the online news aggregator that curates and features sourced original content from around the web. Powered by United Nations Foundation.

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