change Archive

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Live webinar on evaluation of climate change intervention for excluded populations, 11 June

Evaluation of climate change intervention for excluded populations. Where: in front of your personal or work computer anywhere in the world. When: Monday, 11th June 2012, 1:00 to 2:00 PM New York time. Cost: Free. No prior registration required.

Within the series of monthly live webinars on Equity-focused evaluations , UNICEF, UNWOMEN, the Rockefeller Foundation, Claremont Graduate University, and IOCE in partnership with IDEAS, OHCHR, UNEG Task Force on National Evaluation Capacities, UNDP, ILO, IDRC and PAHO, are pleased to announce the fourteenth webinar with *Julian BARR*, /International Trade & Development (ITAD)/, and *Robbie GREGOROWSKI*, /International Trade & Development (ITAD)/, on “*Evaluation of climate change intervention for excluded populations*”.

Detailed agenda and instruction on how to log in are available at MyM&E
[http://mymande.org/sites/default/files/June11-2012_Julian-Robbie_0_0.pdf].

Recording and presentations of previous webinars on *“Emerging Practices in
Development Evaluation” are available at http://mymande.org/webinars/webcast-main-page/3 Source: Relac

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DCED: Measuring and Reporting Results – The DCED Standard

Version VI of the DCED Standard for results measurement is now available on the Measuring and Reporting Results page. This version is fundamentally the same as Version V, with some formatting improvements and added clarity, in light of feedback received.One key change is that Control Point 8.4 (“findings of the system are used in programme management and decision making”) has become compulsory rather than recommended – since this underpins the rationale for the Standard. Comments and feedback are still welcome until the end of February 2012. DCED: Measuring and Reporting Results – The DCED Standard.

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ci:grasp

Home | ci:grasp.

ci:grasp aims to support decision-makers and climate change adaptation practitioners in developing countries by providing structured and coherent climate information. Information is presented following an impact chain logic, where climate change stimuli lead to climate impacts, which in turn require adaptation measures. Information is currently available for nine focal countries. The platform contains almost 1,000 thematic maps and nearly 300 outlines of existing adaptation projects. It will be expanded continuously. Users are invited to contribute to the adaptation project database, share their knowledge on adaptation, and give feedback on ci:grasp.

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Monitoring and evaluation conference: new developments and challenge · INTRAC

Conferences · Events · INTRAC.

Monitoring and evaluation conference: new developments and challenges
Organisation: INTRAC, PSO & PRIA
Start date: 14 June 2011

14-16 June 2011, The Netherlands

This international conference will examine key elements and challenges confronting the evaluation of international development, including its funding, practice and future.

The main themes of the conference will include: governance and accountability; impact; M&E in complex contexts of social change; the M&E of advocacy; M&E of capacity building; programme evaluation in an era of results-based management; M&E of humanitarian programmes; the design of M&E systems; evaluating networks, including community driven networks; changing theories of change and how this relates to M&E methods and approaches.

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How can better models of change sharpen up our work on development | Duncan Green

How can better models of change sharpen up our work on development?

via

Duncan Green, Head of Research for Oxfam GB and author of ‘From Poverty to Power’, has a new blog entry. It relates to our discussion about systems thinking in evaluation. What does complexity theory add to/subtract from our thinking about development?

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How can better models of change sharpen up our work on development | Duncan Green

From Poverty to Power by Duncan Green.

Duncan Green, Head of Research for Oxfam GB and author of ‘From Poverty to Power’, has a new blog entry. It relates to our discussion about systems thinking in evaluation. What does complexity theory add to/subtract from our thinking about development?

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New Challenges, New Beginnings – Next Steps in European Development Cooperation

It is a coincidence that two things have happened simultaneously – and the coincidence will be a happy one if the two can be brought together.

On the one hand, Europe has emerged from eight years of introspection with new structures, a new leadership team and a new platform (the Lisbon Treaty) for more effective collective action.

On the other hand, the global financial crisis has provided a sobering wake-up call about the extent of mutual inter-dependence and the scale of the challenges the world must face. The global challenges will shape international development cooperation in coming years and have already led to new thinking and new approaches.

The financial crisis affected all countries and revealed new vulnerabilities. The most affected suffered a combination of falling export volumes and values, lower financial flows, lower remittances, and sometimes lower aid. Although global recovery has begun, it is uneven in scale and speed. Countries entered and will leave the recession very differently equipped to manage the next wave of challenges. There is likely to be greater differentiation among developing countries as a result. Climate change will be by far the biggest of the next wave, but developing countries must also deal with rapid urbanisation, demographic change, and a whole range of global risks, from disease pandemics to the risk of new food crises. Fragile states pose an especially demanding challenge, to their own populations but also to the global community. A new age of challenges requires a new approach.

via Europe’s World – The only Europe-wide Ideas Community – Partner Posts.

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Public consultation on external relations funding

The European Commission has launched a public consultation on how the EU should fund
its external relations activities, in particular the European External Action Service
(EEAS). Contributions will be used by the Commission next year when preparing its
proposals for the EU budget after 2013. The EU budget has been the subject of much
wrangling in recent weeks between the EU institutions, following pressure from some
member states to impose tough restrictions on future EU budgets and fierce resistance from Parliament. The Commission website states: ‘‘Challenges for the future are plentiful. The EU’s external action must tackle global problems such as climate
change, energy security, and economic and financial stability. The 2015 deadline for
the Millennium Development Goals is also rapidly approaching, with more effort still
required as regards poverty, hunger, maternal and child mortality, sanitation and environmental sustainability.” See http://tinyurl.com/38y4aj6

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UNCTAD Least Developed Countries Report

On Friday 26 November, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) launched its Least Developed Countries Report 2010, subtitled ‘Towards a new
international development architecture for LDCs’. The report argues that the world’s
49 Least Developed Countries (LDCs) need ‘‘more and better-designed financing — rising from an estimated $4 billion to $17 billion per annum by 2030 — to cope with the difficulties posed by climate change. The report calls for ‘‘a new international architecture to support LDCs”, which would establish international funds for
infrastructure, green development, climate change mitigation, productive capacities
and financing innovation for LDCs. Climate change is a particularly crucial issue for
LDCs, as the report notes that it has been estimated that ‘‘for every 1˚C rise in
average global temperatures, annual average growth in poor countries could drop by 2–3
percentage points, with no change in the growth performance of rich countries”. The
report is intended to inform debate at the Fourth United Nations Conference on Least Developed Countries, which will be held in May next year in Istanbul. http://tinyurl.com/24mfsb9

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African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Observatory on Migration launched

On 25 October 2010, the Observatory was launched in Brussels at a ceremony attended by Development Commissioner Andris Piebalgs. The new body is intended to ‘‘provide
reliable data and information on migration flows in ACP countries” and ‘‘to design
better policies to enhance the migration contribution to development”. The Observatory will provide policy-oriented research on key topics such as labour migration,
migration and health, remittances, brain drain/gain, forced migration and climate
change. The total budget for the project is around € 9.4 million, around €8 million of
which is financed from the 9th European Development Fund. http://www.acpmigration-obs.org