climate Archive

  • All regions of the world would suffer – some more than others – but the report finds that the poor will suffer the most. WASHINGTON, November 18, 2012 – The world is barreling down a path to heat up by 4 degrees at the end of the century if the global community fails to act on climate change, triggering a cascade of cataclysmic changes that include extreme heat-waves, declining global food stocks and a sea-level rise affecting hundreds of millions of people, according to a new scientific report released today that was commissioned by the World Bank. Turn Down the Heat, a snapshot of the latest climate science prepared for the World Bank by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and Climate Analytics, says that the world is on a path to a 4 degree Celsius[1] (4°C) warmer world by end of this century and current greenhouse gas […]

    Risks of 4 Degree Hotter World by End of Century

    All regions of the world would suffer – some more than others – but the report finds that the poor will suffer the most. WASHINGTON, November 18, 2012 – The world is barreling down a path to heat up by 4 degrees at the end of the century if the global community fails to act on climate change, triggering a cascade of cataclysmic changes that include extreme heat-waves, declining global food stocks and a sea-level rise affecting hundreds of millions of people, according to a new scientific report released today that was commissioned by the World Bank. Turn Down the Heat, a snapshot of the latest climate science prepared for the World Bank by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and Climate Analytics, says that the world is on a path to a 4 degree Celsius[1] (4°C) warmer world by end of this century and current greenhouse gas […]

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  • The Evaluation Oversight Committee (EOC) of the Independent Evaluation of the Climate Investment Funds (CIF) requests your feedback on the draft approach to the evaluation. The EOC (of which IEG is a member) would particularly like input on the proposed evaluation questions, and the overall scope and purpose of the evaluation. Please visit http://www.cifevaluation.org to read the draft Approach Paper, learn more about the evaluation, and submit your comments. Feedback is requested by July 20, 2012. The EOC may be contacted at eoc@cifevaluation.org. More information: Climate Investment Funds (CIF).

    Provide your feedback to an upcoming evaluation of the Climate Investment Funds

    The Evaluation Oversight Committee (EOC) of the Independent Evaluation of the Climate Investment Funds (CIF) requests your feedback on the draft approach to the evaluation. The EOC (of which IEG is a member) would particularly like input on the proposed evaluation questions, and the overall scope and purpose of the evaluation. Please visit http://www.cifevaluation.org to read the draft Approach Paper, learn more about the evaluation, and submit your comments. Feedback is requested by July 20, 2012. The EOC may be contacted at eoc@cifevaluation.org. More information: Climate Investment Funds (CIF).

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  • Evaluation of climate change intervention for excluded populations. Where: in front of your personal or work computer anywhere in the world. When: Monday, 11th June 2012, 1:00 to 2:00 PM New York time. Cost: Free. No prior registration required. Within the series of monthly live webinars on Equity-focused evaluations , UNICEF, UNWOMEN, the Rockefeller Foundation, Claremont Graduate University, and IOCE in partnership with IDEAS, OHCHR, UNEG Task Force on National Evaluation Capacities, UNDP, ILO, IDRC and PAHO, are pleased to announce the fourteenth webinar with *Julian BARR*, /International Trade & Development (ITAD)/, and *Robbie GREGOROWSKI*, /International Trade & Development (ITAD)/, on “*Evaluation of climate change intervention for excluded populations*”. Detailed agenda and instruction on how to log in are available at MyM&E [http://mymande.org/sites/default/files/June11-2012_Julian-Robbie_0_0.pdf]. Recording and presentations of previous webinars on *“Emerging Practices in Development Evaluation” are available at http://mymande.org/webinars/webcast-main-page/3 Source: Relac

    Live webinar on evaluation of climate change intervention for excluded populations, 11 June

    Evaluation of climate change intervention for excluded populations. Where: in front of your personal or work computer anywhere in the world. When: Monday, 11th June 2012, 1:00 to 2:00 PM New York time. Cost: Free. No prior registration required. Within the series of monthly live webinars on Equity-focused evaluations , UNICEF, UNWOMEN, the Rockefeller Foundation, Claremont Graduate University, and IOCE in partnership with IDEAS, OHCHR, UNEG Task Force on National Evaluation Capacities, UNDP, ILO, IDRC and PAHO, are pleased to announce the fourteenth webinar with *Julian BARR*, /International Trade & Development (ITAD)/, and *Robbie GREGOROWSKI*, /International Trade & Development (ITAD)/, on “*Evaluation of climate change intervention for excluded populations*”. Detailed agenda and instruction on how to log in are available at MyM&E [http://mymande.org/sites/default/files/June11-2012_Julian-Robbie_0_0.pdf]. Recording and presentations of previous webinars on *“Emerging Practices in Development Evaluation” are available at http://mymande.org/webinars/webcast-main-page/3 Source: Relac

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  • Development progress in the world’s poorest countries could be halted or even reversed by mid-century unless bold steps are taken now to slow climate change, prevent further environmental damage, and reduce deep inequalities within and among nations, according to projections in the 2011 Human Development Report, launched by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) here today. The 2011 Report—Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All—argues that environmental sustainability can be most fairly and effectively achieved by addressing health, education, income, and gender disparities together with the need for global action on energy production and ecosystem protection. The Report was launched in Copenhagen today by UNDP Administrator Helen Clark with Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt, whose new government has pledged to reduce Denmark’s CO2 emissions by a dramatic 40 percent over the next 10 years. As the world community prepares for the landmark UN Conference on Sustainable Development in June […]

    Environmental trends threaten global progress for the poor,,warns 2011 Human Development Report

    Development progress in the world’s poorest countries could be halted or even reversed by mid-century unless bold steps are taken now to slow climate change, prevent further environmental damage, and reduce deep inequalities within and among nations, according to projections in the 2011 Human Development Report, launched by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) here today. The 2011 Report—Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All—argues that environmental sustainability can be most fairly and effectively achieved by addressing health, education, income, and gender disparities together with the need for global action on energy production and ecosystem protection. The Report was launched in Copenhagen today by UNDP Administrator Helen Clark with Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt, whose new government has pledged to reduce Denmark’s CO2 emissions by a dramatic 40 percent over the next 10 years. As the world community prepares for the landmark UN Conference on Sustainable Development in June […]

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  • ADB is helping developing countries shift to low-carbon growth and protect those most vulnerable against the expected impacts of climate change. ADB’s long-term strategic framework for 2008-2020 (Strategy 2020) makes tackling climate change part of our core operations. ADB is supporting a comprehensive program of assistance to developing member countries for climate change mitigation and adaptation measures, and mainstreaming of climate change considerations into ADB operations. http://www.adb.org/Documents/Brochures/InFocus/climate-change.asp

    Climate Change and Asian Development Bank

    ADB is helping developing countries shift to low-carbon growth and protect those most vulnerable against the expected impacts of climate change. ADB’s long-term strategic framework for 2008-2020 (Strategy 2020) makes tackling climate change part of our core operations. ADB is supporting a comprehensive program of assistance to developing member countries for climate change mitigation and adaptation measures, and mainstreaming of climate change considerations into ADB operations. http://www.adb.org/Documents/Brochures/InFocus/climate-change.asp

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  • Home | ci:grasp. ci:grasp aims to support decision-makers and climate change adaptation practitioners in developing countries by providing structured and coherent climate information. Information is presented following an impact chain logic, where climate change stimuli lead to climate impacts, which in turn require adaptation measures. Information is currently available for nine focal countries. The platform contains almost 1,000 thematic maps and nearly 300 outlines of existing adaptation projects. It will be expanded continuously. Users are invited to contribute to the adaptation project database, share their knowledge on adaptation, and give feedback on ci:grasp.

    ci:grasp

    Home | ci:grasp. ci:grasp aims to support decision-makers and climate change adaptation practitioners in developing countries by providing structured and coherent climate information. Information is presented following an impact chain logic, where climate change stimuli lead to climate impacts, which in turn require adaptation measures. Information is currently available for nine focal countries. The platform contains almost 1,000 thematic maps and nearly 300 outlines of existing adaptation projects. It will be expanded continuously. Users are invited to contribute to the adaptation project database, share their knowledge on adaptation, and give feedback on ci:grasp.

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  • THE CLUB OF ROME – A New Path for World Development. It is clear that the present path of world development is not sustainable in the longer term, even if we recognise the enormous potentials of the market and of technological innovation. New ideas and strategies will be needed to ensure that improved living conditions and opportunities for a growing population across the world can be reconciled with the conservation of a viable climate and of the fragile ecosystems on which all life depends. A new vision and path for world development must be conceived and adopted if humanity is to surmount the challenges ahead. In response to this intellectual and practical challenge, the Club of Rome will undertake a three year programme on “A New Path for World Development” so as to achieve a better understanding of the complex challenges which confront the modern world and to lay solid […]

    THE CLUB OF ROME – A New Path for World Development

    THE CLUB OF ROME – A New Path for World Development. It is clear that the present path of world development is not sustainable in the longer term, even if we recognise the enormous potentials of the market and of technological innovation. New ideas and strategies will be needed to ensure that improved living conditions and opportunities for a growing population across the world can be reconciled with the conservation of a viable climate and of the fragile ecosystems on which all life depends. A new vision and path for world development must be conceived and adopted if humanity is to surmount the challenges ahead. In response to this intellectual and practical challenge, the Club of Rome will undertake a three year programme on “A New Path for World Development” so as to achieve a better understanding of the complex challenges which confront the modern world and to lay solid […]

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  • Evaluation of CCAI (climate change adaptation interventions) is challenging as they are diverse, cutting across sectors and scales. Few evaluations have yet been undertaken. Monitoring and evaluation is often designed post-hoc and not embedded in the project. Methods could be improved through: • Mechanisms to provide ongoing feedback on impacts beyond the lifespan of the project; • Participatory evaluation – 360° • Impact indicators developed in partnership with beneficiaries • Baseline scenarios and development of the capacity to monitor change over long timescales, retain the information and provide it in usable formats at the right time. via Institute of Development Studies – Evaluating adaptation to climate change from a development perspective.

    Evaluating adaptation to climate change from a development perspective | IDS

    Evaluation of CCAI (climate change adaptation interventions) is challenging as they are diverse, cutting across sectors and scales. Few evaluations have yet been undertaken. Monitoring and evaluation is often designed post-hoc and not embedded in the project. Methods could be improved through: • Mechanisms to provide ongoing feedback on impacts beyond the lifespan of the project; • Participatory evaluation – 360° • Impact indicators developed in partnership with beneficiaries • Baseline scenarios and development of the capacity to monitor change over long timescales, retain the information and provide it in usable formats at the right time. via Institute of Development Studies – Evaluating adaptation to climate change from a development perspective.

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  • On Friday 26 November, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) launched its Least Developed Countries Report 2010, subtitled ‘Towards a new international development architecture for LDCs’. The report argues that the world’s 49 Least Developed Countries (LDCs) need ‘‘more and better-designed financing — rising from an estimated $4 billion to $17 billion per annum by 2030 — to cope with the difficulties posed by climate change. The report calls for ‘‘a new international architecture to support LDCs”, which would establish international funds for infrastructure, green development, climate change mitigation, productive capacities and financing innovation for LDCs. Climate change is a particularly crucial issue for LDCs, as the report notes that it has been estimated that ‘‘for every 1˚C rise in average global temperatures, annual average growth in poor countries could drop by 2–3 percentage points, with no change in the growth performance of rich countries”. The report […]

    UNCTAD Least Developed Countries Report

    On Friday 26 November, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) launched its Least Developed Countries Report 2010, subtitled ‘Towards a new international development architecture for LDCs’. The report argues that the world’s 49 Least Developed Countries (LDCs) need ‘‘more and better-designed financing — rising from an estimated $4 billion to $17 billion per annum by 2030 — to cope with the difficulties posed by climate change. The report calls for ‘‘a new international architecture to support LDCs”, which would establish international funds for infrastructure, green development, climate change mitigation, productive capacities and financing innovation for LDCs. Climate change is a particularly crucial issue for LDCs, as the report notes that it has been estimated that ‘‘for every 1˚C rise in average global temperatures, annual average growth in poor countries could drop by 2–3 percentage points, with no change in the growth performance of rich countries”. The report […]

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  • Over a decade ago, most countries joined an international treaty — the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) — to begin to consider what can be done to reduce global warming and to cope with whatever temperature increases are inevitable. More recently, a number of nations approved an addition to the treaty: the Kyoto Protocol, which has more powerful (and legally binding) measures. The Kyoto Protocol is an international and legally binding agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide entered into force on 16 February 2005. The UNFCCC secretariat supports all institutions involved in the climate change process, particularly the COP (Conference of the Parties), the subsidiary bodies and their Bureau. To help countries meet their emission targets, and to encourage the private sector and developing countries to contribute to emission reduction efforts, negotiators of the Protocol included three market-based mechanisms – Emissions Trading, the Clean Development Mechanism […]

    UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen

    Over a decade ago, most countries joined an international treaty — the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) — to begin to consider what can be done to reduce global warming and to cope with whatever temperature increases are inevitable. More recently, a number of nations approved an addition to the treaty: the Kyoto Protocol, which has more powerful (and legally binding) measures. The Kyoto Protocol is an international and legally binding agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide entered into force on 16 February 2005. The UNFCCC secretariat supports all institutions involved in the climate change process, particularly the COP (Conference of the Parties), the subsidiary bodies and their Bureau. To help countries meet their emission targets, and to encourage the private sector and developing countries to contribute to emission reduction efforts, negotiators of the Protocol included three market-based mechanisms – Emissions Trading, the Clean Development Mechanism […]

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  • Developing countries can shift to lower-carbon paths while promoting development and reducing poverty – if they receive financial and technical assistance from high-income countries. This is among the findings of the World Development Report (WDR) 2010, published by the World Bank. It is key, thus the report, that industrialised countries curb their carbon dioxide emissions and foster the development of alternative energy sources. ”If developed countries act now, a ‘climate-smart’ world is feasible, and the costs for getting there will be high but still manageable”, says the report, which was produced with an eye to the upcoming United Nations climate summit due mid-December in Copenhagen, Denmark. Developing countries face 75–80 percent of the potential damage from climate change. They therefore urgently need help to prepare for the impacts – drought, fl oods and rising sea levels. They also need assistance to intensify agricultural production, combat malnutrition and disease, and build […]

    WDR 2010: Development and climate protection can go together

    Developing countries can shift to lower-carbon paths while promoting development and reducing poverty – if they receive financial and technical assistance from high-income countries. This is among the findings of the World Development Report (WDR) 2010, published by the World Bank. It is key, thus the report, that industrialised countries curb their carbon dioxide emissions and foster the development of alternative energy sources. ”If developed countries act now, a ‘climate-smart’ world is feasible, and the costs for getting there will be high but still manageable”, says the report, which was produced with an eye to the upcoming United Nations climate summit due mid-December in Copenhagen, Denmark. Developing countries face 75–80 percent of the potential damage from climate change. They therefore urgently need help to prepare for the impacts – drought, fl oods and rising sea levels. They also need assistance to intensify agricultural production, combat malnutrition and disease, and build […]

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  • A new Oxfam report has warned that at least 4.5 million children could die unless world leaders deliver additional funds to help poor countries fight the growing impact of climate change, rather than diverting it from existing aid promises. The report, ‘Beyond Aid,’ also warns that at least 75 million fewer children are likely to attend school and 8.6 million fewer people could have access to HIV/AIDS treatment if aid is diverted to help poor countries tackle climate change. Without at least $50 billion a year in addition to the 0.7 per cent of national income rich countries have already pledged as aid, recent progress toward the Millennium Development Goals could stall and then go into reverse. Source: Oxfam, http://tinyurl.com/yc5atwj

    Oxfam: Rich countries must not raid aid to pay climate debt

    A new Oxfam report has warned that at least 4.5 million children could die unless world leaders deliver additional funds to help poor countries fight the growing impact of climate change, rather than diverting it from existing aid promises. The report, ‘Beyond Aid,’ also warns that at least 75 million fewer children are likely to attend school and 8.6 million fewer people could have access to HIV/AIDS treatment if aid is diverted to help poor countries tackle climate change. Without at least $50 billion a year in addition to the 0.7 per cent of national income rich countries have already pledged as aid, recent progress toward the Millennium Development Goals could stall and then go into reverse. Source: Oxfam, http://tinyurl.com/yc5atwj

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