indicators Archive

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SDG follow-up and review needs interlinked indicators, monitoring and evaluation

EVALSDG Network’ second briefing note is ready: Counting critically: SDG ‘follow-up and review’ needs interlinked indicators, monitoring and evaluation Global indicators are important for understanding progress towards each of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, they can mask sub-national and thematic variations. They cannot explain how or why change occurred or its significance to different stakeholders. Evaluation helps to define and assess the worth, merit and significance of national policies in different contexts. This briefing introduces key considerations for the use of indicators, monitoring and evaluation of SDGs implementation, review and follow-up at the national level. It promotes the importance of context-sensitivity, broad stakeholder involvement and adaptive management approaches in efforts to achieve development results. It is the second in a series of briefings discussing the role of evaluation in achieving the SDGs. Download the pdf at http://pubs.iied.org/17363IIED EVALSDGs is a network of policymakers, institutions, and practitioners who advocate for […]

EVALSDG Network’ second briefing note is ready:

Counting critically: SDG ‘follow-up and review’ needs interlinked indicators, monitoring and evaluation

Global indicators are important for understanding progress towards each of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, they can mask sub-national and thematic variations. They cannot explain how or why change occurred or its significance to different stakeholders. Evaluation helps to define and assess the worth, merit and significance of national policies in different contexts. This briefing introduces key considerations for the use of indicators, monitoring and evaluation of SDGs implementation, review and follow-up at the national level. It promotes the importance of context-sensitivity, broad stakeholder involvement and adaptive management approaches in efforts to achieve development results. It is the second in a series of briefings discussing the role of evaluation in achieving the SDGs.

Download the pdf at http://pubs.iied.org/17363IIED

EVALSDGs is a network of policymakers, institutions, and practitioners who advocate for the critical roles played by evaluation at the national, regional, and global levels in examining progress toward achievement of the SDGs. EvalSDG members work to support the evaluation community to be prepared for evaluating initiatives towards better outcomes for the SDGs and ultimately, the “World We Want”.

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Do development indicators deceive us? Here is a better approach | Global Dashboard – Blog covering International affairs and global risks

What would these indicators look like? The new assessment criteria would seek to answer questions such as:

1) How great are group-based (ethnic, religious, caste, clan, etc.) economic, political, and cultural horizontal inequities?

2) How equitable is public spending?

3) How equitable are markets?

4) How equitable is the rule of law? Do elites or particular groups have systemic advantages over others?

5) How effective is public authority and the rule of law (taking into account a variety of mechanisms to achieve these)?

6) How inclusive is the concept of citizenship?

7) How equitable is the system of property rights?

8 ) How inclusive and poverty reducing is growth?

9) How diversified is the economy and exports (which depends on the robustness of institutions)?

10) Is political succession institutionalized and predictable?

11) How much does politics revolve around political parties and policies (rather than ethnicity and patronage)?

12) How much do political leaders depend on group identities to gain, hold onto, or compete for power?

13) How well do formal institutions (such as laws) reflect informal institutions? How widely accepted are these? How well do they penetrate society (as opposed to existing above it)?

14) How much investment is going into large factories (which are more risky than other investments)?

15) What is the level of political risk to invest in labor-intensive businesses (which require more effort and are more beneficial to a population)?

16) Is the economy producing an adequate number of jobs for young people?

17) How well can the government implement the policies it puts into place (if a road is supposed to be built, does it? How good is it?)?

18) How well can the government project authority across distance (is it as effective in outlying districts as it is in the capital)?

19) Are the government’s capacity and the country’s economic prospects keeping up with increases in education, urbanization, and the expectations of the population?

20) Are levels of dissatisfaction/frustration rising among powerful out of power actors (elites, identity group leaders, youth leaders, religious leaders, etc.)?
Do development indicators deceive us? Here is a better approach | Global Dashboard – Blog covering International affairs and global risks.

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IEG’s World Bank Project Ratings Database disclosed

IEG independently validates all completion reports that World Bank staff prepares for projects. For a subset of completed projects, IEG performs a more in-depth project evaluation that includes extensive primary research and field work. The corresponding Reviews and Project Performance Assessment Reports codify IEG’s assessments using Likert-scale project performance indicators. This Project Performance Ratings database is the collection of more than 8,000 project assessments covering about 6,000 completed projects, since the unit was originally established in 1967. It is the longest-running development project performance data collection of its kind.
http://ieg.worldbankgroup.org/content/ieg/en/home/ratings.html

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UNESCO Institute for Statistics

UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) contains over 1,000 types of indicators and raw data on education, literacy, science and technology, culture and communication for more than 200 countries. UNESCO Institute for Statistics:.

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3ie’s new Working Paper on Oxfam GB’s approach to evaluating its effectiveness

Non Governmental Organisations often struggle with how they can access useful and
reliable evidence on whether their interventions are actually making an impact. In the new working paper ‘Can we obtain the required rigour without randomisation?’
, authors Karl Hughes
and Claire Hutchings describe some of the challenges NGOs face in accessing credible
feedback on an intervention’s effectiveness . They show that tracking outcome indicators is not a viable option and present an alternative approach being pursued by Oxfam GB, where closing and sufficiently mature projects are randomly selected and subjected to ‘effectiveness audits’. *Read Working Paper.
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OECD launches Your Better Life Index

OECD – Wikiprogress.org.

The OECD Better Life Initiative includes an interactive tool, Your Better Life Index, which enables users to rate their country according to the things they feel make for a better life. The index allows users to compare well-being across 34 countries, based on 11 dimensions identified by the OECD as crucial. The tool allows users to decide what makes their life better.

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Growth. Building Jobs and Prosperity in Developing Countries

UK DFID research on Growth. Building Jobs and Prosperity in Developing Countries

Growth can generate virtuous circles of prosperity and opportunity. Strong growth and employment opportunities improve incentives for parents to invest in their children’s education by sending them to school. This may lead to the emergence of a strong and growing group of entrepreneurs, which should generate pressure for improved governance. Strong economic growth therefore advances human development, which, in turn, promotes economic growth.

But under different conditions, similar rates of growth can have very different effects on poverty, the employment prospects of the poor and broader indicators of human development. The extent to which growth reduces poverty depends on the degree to which the poor participate in the growth process and share in its proceeds. Thus, both the pace and pattern of growth matter for reducing poverty.

A successful strategy of poverty reduction must have at its core measures to promote rapid and sustained economic growth. The challenge for policy is to combine growth-promoting policies with policies that allow the poor to participate fully in the opportunities unleashed and so contribute to that growth. This includes policies to make labour markets work better, remove gender inequalities and increase financial inclusion.

Asian countries are increasingly tackling this agenda of ‘inclusive growth’. India’s most recent development plan has two main objectives: raising ec! onomic growth and making growth more inclusive, policy mirrored elsewhere in South Asia and Africa. Future growth will need to be based on an increasingly globalised world that offers new opportunities but also new challenges. New technologies offer not only ‘catch-up’ potential but also ‘leapfrogging’ possibilities. New science offers better prospects across both productive and service sectors.

Future growth will also need to be environmentally sustainable. Improved management of water and other natural resources is required, together with movement towards low carbon technologies by both developed and developing countries. With the proper institutions, growth and environmental sustainability may be seen as complements, not substitutes.
http://www.dfid.gov.uk/pubs/files/growth-policy-paper.pdf