oecd Archive

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Evaluation Insights on Food Security – DAC EvalNet

With food security rising to the top of development agendas, the DAC EVALNET decided to take stock of evaluation evidence. A systematic review, commissioned by IOB Netherlands, examines evidence on the impact of interventions aimed at improving food security through agriculture production, value chain development, market reform and land tenure. The findings are summarised in the Network’s latest Evaluation Insights: 49567434.pdf (application/pdf Object).

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Development Effectiveness | weitzenegger.de

I started a site covering the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness (HLF-4), Busan, Korea, 29 November to 1 December 2011.

Busan, Korea, 29 November to 1 December 2011

via Development Effectiveness | weitzenegger.de.

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Development Partners to join in Busan HLF-4 for more Effectiveness | www.weitzenegger.de

Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness (HLF-4)
Busan, Korea, 29 November to 1 December 2011

At the fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness approximately 2000 delegates from 160 governments, parliaments, international organisations, civil society and the private sector will review global progress in improving the impact and value for money of development aid and make new commitments to further ensure that aid helps reduce poverty and supports progress in meeting the Millennium Development Goals.

The conference will be a major milestone and turning point for the global aid effectiveness agenda: The conference will assess the achievement of the Paris Declaration targets and the commitments of the Accra Agenda for Action by the 2010 deadline, as well as report on the monitoring of the Fragile States Principles. Significantly, the event will also chart future directions for more effective development aid and contribute towards a new international aid architecture as follow-up to the Paris process. The 2015 MDG deadline and the biennial ECOSOC Development Cooperation Forum will be of particular relevance in this regard and are likely to put the UN system in the limelight during the negotiations.

The Busan Forum is a continuation in a series of High Level Forums on Aid Effectiveness that started in Rome (2003) and continued in Paris (2005) and Accra (2008). For the fourth time since 2003, industrialized and developing countries will be discussing ways of making development cooperation more effective. A third draft of the Busan Outcome Document has been prepared. The Outcome Document will be further discussed and developed and will be finalised at the Busan Forum itself.

It is clear for everyone to see that the context for aid effectiveness has changed a great deal in recent years. Making sure that Busan is about more than just playing the end game of a previous era is vital to us all. The question is, are we brave enough to make it happen?

Michèle Laubscher (Alliance Sud) sees OECD veering in the wrong direction. She writes: ”The last meeting held three years ago in the Ghanaian capital Accra ended with the recognition that effective development cooperation requires democratic ownership, transparency and an enabling environment for to civil society. Another idea that also gained traction in Accra was that aid can contribute only modestly to the social and economic development of poor countries. Much more important are government policies in these countries as well as external factors such as global economic and trade conditions, which are generally dictated by the industrialized countries. Future discussions should therefore be about «development effectiveness» rather than just aid effectiveness. It was not decided at the time what this meant in concrete terms, and this will now be done at the conference in the South Korean city of Busan. The competition for «new donor countries» and the private sector could well set the clock back and water down important principles.” Source: http://www.alliancesud.ch/en/policy/aid/busan-high-level-meeting

AidWatch takes a critical look at the European Commission’s proposals (http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/multimedia/presentations-speeches/conference_en.htm) for the EU common position ahead of the HLF-4. AidWatch is particularly concerned by the proposal to narrow the aid effectiveness agenda down to a more limited set of commitments, to streamline the global monitoring process and the lack of concrete and measureable reform commitments for the EU. http://www.concordeurope.org/Public/Page.php?ID=14347

A global aid transparency group around ”Publish What You Fund” has expressed alarm over the ”pushback” in aid transparency commitments among donor countries while the text for the final document to be approved in the HLF-4 is being negotiated. http://tinyurl.com/cyrnsu7

Women’s groups and gender equality advocates engaged in the HLF-4 process call on all governments and other development actors involved in the HLF-4 and 2012 DCF process to consider some imperatives for Gender Equality (http://www.globaleverantwortung.at/images/doku/womensorganisations_keydemands_busan_oct2011.pdf)

At Busan, world leaders will again proclaim their faith in the power of local parliaments and civil society to make aid more transparent, accountable and effective. ”I have my doubts,” writes Till Bruckner in this Devev Blog. Accountability is inherently demand-driven. If local parliaments and NGOs are to effectively monitor and influence international aid, they must be highly capable, and willing and able to rise to the challenge. In most aid recipient countries, these preconditions for aid accountability simply do not exist. The Busan forum will doubtlessly produce a polished document full of well-intended promises. But if these promises are based on fantasy, not reality, we cannot pressure donors to live up to them. Aid transparency is a necessary precondition for local aid accountability, but in itself is not sufficient. Accountability is a two-way process. Information gives local accountability agencies ammunition to press for change – but only if they are willing and able to do so. Source: http://www.devex.com/en/blogs/full-disclosure/the-local-aid-accountability-delusion

The European Parliament adopted its report on aid effectiveness (http://tinyurl.com/cnoznl7) that demands much more ambitious reforms than the European Commission has proposed so far. The report is published just as EU Member State governments are currently negotiating the joint EU position for the HLF-4. The report calls for further progress to empower developing country‘s people and democratic institutions; and emphasises that donors‘ procurement practices need to be reformed to boost aid‘s economic impact and drive inclusive growth.

Development Partners to join in Busan HLF-4 for more Effectiveness | www.weitzenegger.de.

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Key Documents and Websites to follow the HLF-4

A collection of useful and key documents on Aid Effectiveness are openly available on this OECD page http://tinyurl.com/6awtvd6 to read, reproduce, quote or disseminate in view of making information on Aid Effectiveness, as well as the work of the Working Party on Aid Effectiveness.

Official Event Site http://www.aideffectiveness.org/busanHLF-4/ Official OECD Site http://tinyurl.com/3zemvor
UN Aid Effectiveness Website http://www.undg.org/index.cfm?P=219

CSO Open Forum http://www.cso-effectiveness.org
Fully participatory space for Civil Society Organizations worldwide united to define and advocate a common framework for CSO development effectiveness http://twitter.com/#!/CSOpenForum

The Broker Blog http://www.thebrokeronline.eu/Blogs/Busan-High-Level-Forum
The Broker, in cooperation with the OECD, invites you to contribute to this blog about the challenges of the coming HLF on aid effectivess at Busan.

ODI Blog – The road to Busan and beyond http://tinyurl.com/3gr7d2v ODI experts respond to the conference
http://tinyurl.com/bvetons
In the lead up to the Busan conference, ODI experts explore aid effectiveness alongside country ownership, climate finance, and principles for global agreement.

Official Social Media Sites of the Fourth High Level Forum
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/busanHLF-4
Twitter https://twitter.com/#!/HLF-4Org
Vimeo http://vimeo.com/user7035907
YouTube http://www.youtube.com/user/HLF-4busan
Blog http://www.thebrokeronline.eu/Blogs/Busan-High-Level-Forum RSS http://feeds.feedburner.com/busanHLF-4

Sign on to CSO Asks to Busan: http://www.betteraid.org
Tell world leaders that you want to add a citizen voice to aid and development decisions.

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Green and growth go together, says OECD

The OECD Green Growth Strategy , and the new report, Towards Green Growth, provide a practical framework for governments to boost economic growth and protect the environment.
Governments must look to the green economy to find new sources of growth and jobs. They should put in place policies that tap into the innovation, investment and entrepreneurship driving the shift towards a greener economy. Green growth makes economic as well as environmental sense. In natural resource sectors alone, commercial opportunities related to investments in environmental sustainability could run into trillions of dollars by 2050.
Two broad sets of policies are essential elements in any green growth strategy: the first set mutually reinforces economic growth and the conservation of natural capital, including core fiscal and regulatory settings and innovation policies. The second includes policies that provide incentives to use natural resources efficiently and make pollution more expensive.
Replacing natural capital with physical capital is expensive and the infrastructure needed to clean polluted water can be costly, but the cost of inaction can be higher still. Greening growth now, the report argues, is necessary to prevent further erosion of natural capital, such as increased scarcity of water and other resources, more pollution, climate change, and biodiversity loss, all of which can undermine future growth. In addition to the Synthesis Report, the document Tools for Delivering on Green Growth outlines options available to policy makers for developing green growth strategies. The report Towards Green Growth – Monitoring Progress: OECD Indicators outlines ways to measure progress. http://www.oecd.org/greengrowth

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OECD launches Your Better Life Index

OECD – Wikiprogress.org.

The OECD Better Life Initiative includes an interactive tool, Your Better Life Index, which enables users to rate their country according to the things they feel make for a better life. The index allows users to compare well-being across 34 countries, based on 11 dimensions identified by the OECD as crucial. The tool allows users to decide what makes their life better.

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OECD: Green and growth go together

OECD work on green growth.

Governments must look to the green economy to find new sources of growth and jobs. They should put in place policies that tap into the innovation, investment and entrepreneurship driving the shift towards a greener economy.

Green growth makes economic as well as environmental sense. In natural resource sectors alone, commercial opportunities related to investments in environmental sustainability could run into trillions of dollars by 2050.

The OECD Green Growth Strategy, and the new report, Towards Green Growth, provide a practical framework for governments to boost economic growth and protect the environment.

“This report shows that green and growth can go together,” said the OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría. “With the right policies in place, we can create jobs, increase prosperity, preserve our environment and improve the quality of life. All at the same time.”

Two broad sets of policies are essential elements in any green growth strategy: the first set mutually reinforces economic growth and the conservation of natural capital, including core fiscal and regulatory settings and innovation policies. The second includes policies that provide incentives to use natural resources efficiently and make pollution more expensive.

Replacing natural capital with physical capital is expensive and the infrastructure needed to clean polluted water can be costly, but the cost of inaction can be higher still. Greening growth now, the report argues, is necessary to prevent further erosion of natural capital, such as increased scarcity of water and other resources, more pollution, climate change, and biodiversity loss, all of which can undermine future growth.

In addition to the Synthesis Report, the document Tools for Delivering on Green Growth outlines options available to policy makers for developing green growth strategies. The report Towards Green Growth – Monitoring Progress: OECD Indicators outlines ways to measure progress.

The OECD will continue to support national and global efforts to promote green growth in the run-up to the Rio+20 Conference. Going forward, OECD will integrate green growth into national reviews and in future work on indicators, toolkits, sectoral studies and development co-operation.

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New OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises

OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises.

Ministers from OECD and developing economies will today agree new guidelines to promote more responsible business conduct by multinational enterprises, and a second set of guidance to limit the use of conflict minerals.

Forty-two countries will commit to new, tougher standards of corporate behaviour in the updated Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises: the 34 OECD countries plus Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, Peru and Romania. The updated Guidelines include new recommendations on human rights abuse and company responsibility for their supply chains, making them the first inter-governmental agreement in this area.

The Guidelines establish that firms should respect human rights in every country in which they operate. Companies should also respect environmental and labour standards, for example, and have appropriate due diligence processes in place to ensure this happens. These include issues such as paying decent wages, combating bribe solicitation and extortion, and the promotion of sustainable consumption.

The Guidelines are a comprehensive, non-binding code of conduct that OECD member countries and others have agreed to promote among the business sector. A new, tougher process for complaints and mediation has also been put in place.

“The business community shares responsibility for restoring growth and trust in markets,” said OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría. “These guidelines will help the private sector grow their businesses responsibly by promoting human rights and boosting social development around the world.”

Ministers from adhering countries will also agree to a Recommendation designed to combat the illicit trade in minerals that finance armed conflict.

Illegal exploitation of natural resources in fragile African states has been fueling conflict across the region for decades. While data is scarce, it is estimated that up to 80% of minerals in some of the worst-affected zones may be smuggled out. The illegal trade stokes conflict, boosts crime and corruption, finances international terrorism and blocks economic and social development.

The Recommendation clarifies how companies can identify and better manage risks throughout the supply chain, from local exporters and mineral processors to the manufacturing and brand-name companies that use these minerals in their products.

The OECD and emerging economies worked closely with business, trade unions and non-governmental organisations to produce both sets of guidelines.

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OECD Factsheet: Managing Joint Evaluations

This factsheet answers basic questions, like: What is joint evaluation? When are joint approaches more (or less) suitable? And, what are the potential benefits and challenges?.

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Donors’ mixed aid performance for 2010 sparks concern

Aid to developing countries in 2010 will reach record levels in dollar terms after increasing by 35 per cent since 2004. But it will still be less than the world’s major aid donors promised five years ago at the Gleneagles and Millennium + 5 summits. Though a majority of countries will meet their commitments, the underperformance of several large donors means there will be a significant shortfall, according to a new OECD review.

Africa, in particular, is likely to get only about USD 12 billion of the USD 25 billion increase envisaged at Gleneagles, due in large part to the underperformance of some European donors who give large shares of official development assistance (ODA) to Africa. Eckhard Deutscher, Chair of the DAC, noted that: ”Aid has increased strongly as 16 donors have honoured their commitments. But underperformance by the others, notably Austria, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, and Portugal, means overall aid will still fall considerably short of what was promised. These commitments were made and confirmed repeatedly by heads of governments and it is essential that they be met to the full extent.”

Commenting on the figures, OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría said: ”It is reassuring that most donors are recognising their international responsibilities. As we head into new rounds of discussions about funding climate change and food security concerns, I encourage all donors to carry through on their development promises.” Source: OECD, http://tinyurl.com/ye8zrej

The EU falls short $19bn on development pledges. Some of the overall shortfall will come from the EU15 – the old, wealthier member states that made the original pledges. EU countries are skipping out to the tune of $19 billion (€14bn) on the aid pledges they made to developing countries five years ago at a landmark G8 meeting, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Aid to poor countries in 2010 will be lower than donors promised five years ago at the 2005 Group of Eight meeting in Scotland – largely as a result of the economic crisis, says a report published on Tuesday by the OECD, the international club of wealthy countries. With national budgets squeezed in the wake of the crash, many governments believe that charity begins at home.

Max Lawson, senior policy adviser at Oxfam, said: ”These broken promises are nothing short of a scandal. A woman dies every minute in childbirth somewhere in the world because of inadequate medical care and 72 million children remain out of school. The missing $21bn could pay for every child to go to school, and could save the lives of 2 million of the poorest mothers and children.” Source: EU Observer, http://euobserver.com/19/29496