social Archive

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Social protection: a new area of action for EU development cooperation

The Directorate for Human and Society Development in DG DEVCO of the European Commission is presently preparing a communication on Social protection in EU development policy with the purpose of explaining “the role of SP in underpinning inclusive and sustainable development and the role of EU Development Cooperation in supporting the strengthening of social protection policies and systems.”
This communication will be part of the EC tools for the implementation of the Agenda for Change and its ‘inclusive growth’ central objective.

The obligation for governments to implement social protection programmes stems from the right to social security enshrined in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Social security standards are set out in the Social Security (Minimum Standards) Convention of 1952 (No. 102). Social protection is also one of the four pillars of the Decent Work Agenda, which the EU has committed to supporting in its development cooperation. It is in the context of that Decent work Agenda that the new EC communication is prepared.

As explained by an EC official taking part in the process, in the context of the communication, social protection refers to policies and measures that provide people with security against the risks and vulnerabilities that can both cause and deepen poverty. It also supports access to health and other essential services and income security throughout the lifecycle. It includes active labour market policies to help people to participate in economic activity and strengthens social cohesion through its role in supporting participation and reducing social polarisation through the redistribution of wealth.

Various aspects of social protection are usually referred to with specific terminology. Social security is usually used to refer to measures providing benefits, whether in cash or in kind, to secure protection from a variety of risks such as ill-health or unemployment. Contributory schemes are usually referred to as social insurance, while non-contributory schemes are usually referred to as social assistance.

It is the intention of the EC to produce a value based communication that addresses the question of Social protection as a human right in the context of growth with equity. Hence, the communication will refer to SP at the heart of EU social model based on the European values, universality and equity. That part of the communication should also tackle the problems faced by the EU today and the way to address them in the EU 2020 strategy.

The communication will then address social protection in the context of development and the different challenges relating to it in different categories of countries. At the centre of the EU approach will be the principle of strong national ownership including financing. Coordinated approach and support between the EC and the member states will also be covered by the communication as well as the question of policy coherence for development. The communication should also bring some more light on the specific type of measures and cooperation modalities in different categories of countries (LICs and MICs). In our view the communication should be accompanied with a set of guidelines so that EU delegations are in a position to discuss the question with partner governments during the upcoming EC aid programming process especially in the case social protection is identified as a priority sector for EC aid. Source: APRODEV.
Online consultation:
http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/how/public-consultations/6404_en.htm

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Global Human Development Forum adopts ‘Istanbul Declaration’ urging action at ‘Rio+20’

Istanbul, 23 March 2012

Delegates to the first Global Human Development Forum today unanimously adopted an “Istanbul Declaration” calling on the world community to take bold action against global social inequities and environmental deterioration at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio this June.

“It is time to reset the global development agenda,” the Istanbul Declaration states. “The world needs a renewed commitment to sustainable development and strong political leadership to implement it.”

The Declaration stresses the need for global and national development strategies to put “strong emphasis on social inclusion, social protection, and equity, in recognition of the fact that economic development has too often gone hand in hand with environmental degradation and increased inequality.”

Achieving those goals will require better-coordinated “mobilization of global capital and local resources”, good governance on the local and global level, and full empowerment of women “through access to education, health care, basic services and their participation in the labour force,” the Declaration says.

The Declaration endorses the recommendations of the Secretary-General’s High-Level Panel on Global Sustainability and UNDP’s 2011 Human Development Report on Sustainability and Equity, and stresses “the need to maintain progress towards meeting the Millennium Development Goals in 2015, while building a consensus for a new post-2015 global framework that:

– Is universal in character, with relevance for all nations;
– Reflects the entirety of the sustainable development agenda, including the continuing importance of reducing poverty and inequality—particularly for the least developed countries;
– Addresses all three dimensions of sustainable development (social, economic and environmental), and their interconnections; and
– Is based on measurable indicators that can promote effective monitoring of progress and response to challenges.”

In a personal message to Forum participants, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said: “Sustainable development recognizes that our economic, social and environmental objectives are not competing goals that must be traded off against each other, but are interconnected objectives that are most effectively pursued together in a holistic manner. We need an outcome from Rio+20 that reflect this understanding and that relates to the concerns of all.”

More than 120 heads of state and government have confirmed their participation in the Rio conference, making it one of the largest such gatherings of world leaders in recent times. Government and civil society leaders from developing countries have strongly urged that the Rio conference address not only ecological threats such as climate change and pollution, but place equal emphasis on such critical social concerns as hunger, preventable disease and endemic poverty.

“We manage what we measure—and, in turn, what we measure affects what we do,” the Istanbul Declaration stated. “It is therefore vital that we measure progress towards sustainable development in a more comprehensive manner. Measures are required that go beyond GDP to capture a fuller picture of human development, and emphasize sustainable and equitable outcomes. We urge greater support for the work underway around the world, in the United Nations and elsewhere, to design and use more appropriate measures of progress, and for countries and communities to collect data accordingly.”

“In 2011 and so far in 2012, we have heard clear warnings from Nature that humanity is arrogantly pushing her boundaries, just as we have heard societies demanding human rights and justice, opportunities and decent jobs, affordable health care and energy access,” said Olav Kjorven, director of UNDP’s Bureau of Development Policy. “Responding successfully will require decision-makers from across the environmental, social and economic divides coming together to create the future we all want.”

To access the Declaration, visit: http://hdr.undp.org/en/humandev/forum2012/

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Urgent international action needed to combat social inequalities and environmental risks, UN Secretary-General

UNDP’s first Global Human Development Forum starts today in Istanbul

Istanbul, 22 March 2012—Social justice and environmental protection are equally urgent and intrinsically linked universal goals, with coordinated global action needed on both fronts at the UN’s ‘Rio+20’ Conference on Sustainable Development in June, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in a message to an audience of development experts, civil society leaders and government officials at the first Global Human Development Forum here today.

“The world stands at a crossroads,” the Secretary-General said in his message to the Istanbul Forum, convened by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Government of Turkey.

“We need everyone – government ministers and policymakers, business and civil society leaders, and young people – to work together to transform our economies, to place our societies on a more just and equitable footing, and to protect the resources and ecosystems on which our shared future depends.”

UNDP’s 2011 Human Development Report —“Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All,” which argued that social inequalities and environmental hazards must be combated together for the sake of future generations— provided the framework for the two-day Istanbul dialogue. The Global Human Development Forum was organized to examine the critical social, economic and environmental challenges facing the world today, including better approaches to assessing national and global progress.

“The concept of human development originated in well-founded dissatisfaction with using only gross domestic product as a measure of human progress,” the Secretary-General noted in his statement today. “Though this understanding has become something of a benchmark in our thinking about development, there remains a need to dramatically change the way we value and measure progress.”

UNDP Associate Administrator Rebeca Grynspan and Deputy Prime Minister Ali Babacan of Turkey opened the Forum today by stressing the importance of collective global action at the “Rio + 20” conference three months from now. “This Forum is particularly timely and important,” Grynspan said. “It provides a unique opportunity to debate the messages we want to take to Brazil, reflecting on what we have learned since the Stockholm Conference in 1972 and the Earth Summit in 1992.”

More than a hundred heads of state will be leading their national delegations to the June Conference on Sustainable Development, making it one of the largest such high-level gatherings in recent times.

“We must recognize that high-carbon; unequal growth will undermine itself by breeding social unrest and violence, and by destroying natural habitats critical for livelihoods,” added Grynspan. “We need a new paradigm of growth and a new approach to the political economy of sustainable development.”

The Global Human Development Forum will culminate Friday with an “Istanbul Declaration” articulating the participants’ jointly proposed goals and priorities for the “Rio+20” summit.

“Sustainable development recognizes that our economic, social and environmental objectives are not competing goals that must be traded off against each other, but are interconnected objectives that are most effectively pursued together in a holistic manner,” the Secretary-General said in his message today. “We need an outcome from Rio+20 that reflect this understanding and that relates to the concerns of all.”

Deputy Prime Minister Babacan, a member of the Secretary-General’s High-Level Panel on Global Sustainability, urged the adoption of new ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ to guide global priorities following the 2015 conclusion of the UN’s 15-year Millennium Development Goals campaign. Cevdet Yilmaz, Turkey’s Minister of Development, who moderated the Forum discussion on the “Social Contract: Building Equity and Sustainability”, said: “The Forum provides a solid platform to share different viewpoints on the universal goal of having resilient people and a resilient planet.”

Tarja Halonen, the former president of Finland and co-chair of the High-Level Panel on Global Sustainability Panel, will speak today in a special Forum session devoted to the Panel’s recommendations. Forum discussion topics today and Friday also include: “A New Deal on Sustainable Development”; “Innovative Financing for Sustainable Future”; “Assessing Human Progress”; and “Building Coalitions for Change”. The Forum will feature the launch Friday of a major new report by the U.N. Economic Commission for Europe: “From Transition to Transformation: Sustainable and Inclusive Development in Europe and Central Asia”.

Other leading government officials and development experts participating in the Istanbul discussions include Kandeh K. Yumkella, Director-General, United Nations Industrial Development Organization; Thakur Singh Powdyel, Minister for Education of Bhutan; Brian Atwood, Chair, Development Assistance Committee, the OECD; Gunilla Carlsson, Minister for Development Cooperation, Sweden; Wycliffe Ambetsa Oparanya, Minister of Planning, Kenya; and Senator Cristovam Buarque of Brazil.

The Global Human Development Forum was organized jointly by UNDP with support from the Turkish Ministry of Development and the Government of Denmark. See http://hdr.undp.org/en/humandev/forum2012/ for more.

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World Bank Approves Program-for-Results

New Financing Instrument Ties Lending Directly To Verified Development Results

The World Bank Board of Executive Directors approved Program-for-Results (PforR), an innovative new financing instrument for the World Bank’s client countries that links the disbursement of funds directly to the delivery of defined results. Money will flow once the results have been delivered and verified.

PforR would support government programs in a diverse range of countries and sectors. In some countries, PforR would help deliver and improve the coverage of antenatal care for mothers and newborns or increase immunization coverage for children. In others, PforR would help provide sustainable water supply and sanitation services; strengthen
the coverage and quality of early childhood and primary education; or contribute to a
government program to reduce the number of rural households living below the poverty line.

‘Enhancing development effectiveness by helping developing countries achieve results
is central to the mission of World Bank,’ said Robert B. Zoellick, President of the
World Bank Group. ‘Program-for-Results financing demands greater accountability from
partner countries and in turn will help these countries continue to deliver sustainable results long after the Bank’s involvement has ended. The time is right for this innovative development approach.’

PforR will also help improve the transparency and accountability of developing country programs, and strengthen systems to fight fraud and corruption. Under the new instrument, the Bank will provide part of the overall funding for a larger, developing country-financed program but will be able to provide its technical expertise to the larger government program. For example, the Bank’s commitment to openness and transparency will be applied to the entire program supported – including through the application of the Bank’s Access to Information policy to PforR operations.

Key assessments – fiduciary, environmental & social – of program systems are an important feature of this new instrument and will help provide assurance that Bank financing is used appropriately and that the environmental and social impacts of the program are adequately addressed. These assessments will all be publically disclosed. PforR financing will also help partner countries improve the design and implementation of their development programs, strengthen institutions, and build capacity.

Says Joachim von Amsberg, World Bank Vice President for Operations Policy and Country
Services, ‘Building effective and accountable institutions in partner countries is key to achieving better development outcomes and results. We believe that with this new instrument, the World Bank jointly with others – government, development partners, civil society, the private sector and others – will be a better partner focused on results, focused on institution building and focused on better partnerships.’ Source: World Bank http://tinyurl.com/6f3afdx

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World Bank Approves Program-for-Results

New Financing Instrument Ties Lending Directly To Verified Development Results

The World Bank Board of Executive Directors approved Program-for-Results (PforR), an innovative new financing instrument for the World Bank’s client countries that links the disbursement of funds directly to the delivery of defined results. Money will flow once the results have been delivered and verified.

PforR would support government programs in a diverse range of countries and sectors. In some countries, PforR would help deliver and improve the coverage of antenatal care for mothers and newborns or increase immunization coverage for children. In others, PforR would help provide sustainable water supply and sanitation services; strengthen the coverage and quality of early childhood and primary education; or contribute to a government program to reduce the number of rural households living below the poverty line.

‘Enhancing development effectiveness by helping developing countries achieve results is central to the mission of World Bank,’ said Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank Group. ‘Program-for-Results financing demands greater accountability from partner countries and in turn will help these countries continue to deliver sustainable results long after the Bank’s involvement has ended. The time is right for this innovative development approach.’

PforR will also help improve the transparency and accountability of developing country programs, and strengthen systems to fight fraud and corruption. Under the new instrument, the Bank will provide part of the overall funding for a larger, developing country-financed program but will be able to provide its technical expertise to the larger government program. For example, the Bank’s commitment to openness and transparency will be applied to the entire program supported – including through the application of the Bank’s Access to Information policy to PforR operations.

Key assessments – fiduciary, environmental & social – of program systems are an important feature of this new instrument and will help provide assurance that Bank financing is used appropriately and that the environmental and social impacts of the program are adequately addressed. These assessments will all be publically disclosed. PforR financing will also help partner countries improve the design and implementation of their development programs, strengthen institutions, and build capacity.

Says Joachim von Amsberg, World Bank Vice President for Operations Policy and Country Services, ‘Building effective and accountable institutions in partner countries is key to achieving better development outcomes and results. We believe that with this new instrument, the World Bank jointly with others – government, development partners, civil society, the private sector and others – will be a better partner focused on results, focused on institution building and focused on better partnerships.’ Source: World Bank http://tinyurl.com/6f3afdx

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Social Research Methods

This website is for people involved in applied social research and evaluation. You’ll find lots of resources and links to other locations on the Web that deal in applied social research methods.

via Social Research Methods.

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Brazil launches National Poverty Alleviation Plan – Brasil Sem Miséria

02-06-2011 MRE: “BRASIL SEM MISÉRIA” NATIONAL POVERTY ALLEVIATION PLAN

Brazil launches National Poverty Alleviation Plan

Comprehensive social program aims to lift 16.2 million citizens out of extreme poverty

BRASÍLIA (02 June 2011) – Brazil´s President Dilma Rousseff today launched a
comprehensive national poverty alleviation plan named “Brasil Sem Miséria” to lift
16.2 million Brazilians out of extreme poverty through cash transfer initiatives, increased access to education, health, welfare, sanitation and electricity, and
productive inclusion. This flagship programof the federal government will create new
programs and expand existing initiatives in partnership with states, municipalities,
public and private companies and civil society organizations to extend the opportunities generated by Brazil´s strong economic growth to its neediest citizens.

“What was a matter of moral ethics and human rights became a key pillar to bring
Brazil’s growth to another level. Social inclusion makes our growth sustainable,” said President Dilma Rousseff during a launchevent today in Brasilia.

According to the President, the fight against poverty is an essential step in the
development of Brazil, but is not the only one. “Along with our fight against poverty,
we are implementing other actions rooted in economic policy based on fiscal control and the expansion of opportunities,” added President Rousseff.

The goal of “Brasil Sem Miséria” is to raise the national average income and overall
quality of life for the Brazilian population by focusing on the demographic that lives
below the extreme poverty line. The plan will identify these families and support them
in an integrated and personalized way through an array of social programs, according to their individual needs. To achieve its goal, the government will utilize the
extreme poverty maps produced by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) based on data collected through the 2010 census.

“Through the poverty alleviation plan, Brazilwill reach our most vulnerable citizens,
wherever they are. From now on, it isn´t the poorest people who have to chase the
State, but the opposite,” said Minister of Social Development and the Fight Against Hunger Tereza Campello.

“Brasil Sem Miséria” will prioritize the expansion of a broad range of public services
to the extremely poor, including documentation, electricity,literacy, medical, dental and ophthalmic treatment, daycare and sanitation. Citizens who are not already
beneficiaries of Brazil’s existing cash transfer programmes, such as “Bolsa Familia”, will be registered for these programs. In addition, the program will emphasize
“productive inclusion” at both the national and regional levels, increasing the skills
and capabilities of citizens to play a functional role in the national economy. In
rural areas, for example, “Brasil Sem Miséria” will encourage increased production through technical assistance, seed distribution and commercial support. In urban
areas, the program will focus on job training and the identification of employment opportunities and demands.

More than 7,000 Centers for Social Assistance spread throughout every municipality
will be the bridge between the families and the array of social programs included in
the poverty alleviation plan. Other social assistance centers are to be built in new locations.

Search activities will identify citizens in need

An active search strategy will be a critical first component of the national plan.
Professional teams will use national demographic data and other methods of outreach to
systematically locate Brazil´s poorest families in order to register them in social
programs and provide support. These teams will also identify existing services and
assess the need to create new social initiatives for unique populations. This initial
stage will include joint community efforts,campaigns, lectures, social and educational
activities, home visits and database cross-referencing to support search activities,
as well as training forsocialworkers to address the needs of families living under the extreme poverty line.

Overcoming the poverty line

The poverty alleviation plan is aimed at Brazilians livingin households with a monthly
income is R$ 70 (US$ 45) or less per person, fulfilling a commitment made by President
Rousseff at the start of her administration in January 2011. National data indicates
that 59 percent of the target citizens live in Brazil’s Northeast region, 47 percent live in rural areas, and 40 percent are 14 years of age or younger.

“It was only possible to reduce inequality and poverty in Brazilin recent years, when
the government introduced actions that combine economic growth with social inclusion,
such as increasing employment, enhancing the minimum wage, expanding social programs
and increasing access to credit. The results obtained so far – 28 million Brazilians
pulled out of poverty and 36 million joining the middle class – confirm that this
strategy is effective. With the poverty alleviation plan, we will cross the map of
extreme poverty with the map of economic opportunity and allow millions of Brazilians to overcome the poverty line,” said Minister Tereza Campello.

Productive inclusion program will offer job training for 1.7 million urban citizens

Urban productive inclusion initiatives will encourage entrepreneurship and fair trade, offering two million citizens professional training courses and employment opportunities to meet demands in the private and public sectors.

To increase job qualifications, the program will aim to serve 1.7 million citizens within the age of the labor force (18 to 65 years) in coordination with existing
government programs and services, including: the Public System of Labor, Employment
and Income; the National Access to TechnicalSchool (Pronatec) program; the National
Youth Inclusion Program (Projovem); the Growth Acceleration Program (PAC); the “My
House, My Life” housing program; as well as the Network of Food and Nutrition Centers.

Other productive inclusion initiatives include programs to provide official
documentation, and extend access to health services, microcredit and vocational guidance.

Garbage pickers to receive tailored support,increasingrecyclable materials collection in Brazil“Brasil Sem Miséria” will also provide support for the organization of
collectors of reusable and recyclable materials, commonly known as “pickers”. For this group, the aim is to improve working conditions and increase opportunities for
socioeconomic inclusion, with emphasis on those citizens living in the capitals and
metropolitan areas, covering 260 municipalities. The poverty alleviation plan will also work to better integrate pickers of recyclable materials into
municipality-ledrecyclables collection programs. The plan will provide training and
strengthen participation of 60,000 garbage pickers in recyclables collection programs by 2014, offer infrastructure support for 280,000 pickers and strengthen 100 recyclable materials trade networks.

A four-fold increase in Food Acquisition Program assistance to family farmers

To address the needs of rural communities, the national poverty alleviation plan aims to increase by four the number of small farmers assisted by the Food Acquisition
Program (FAP). Currently, 66,000 households benefit from the program, which aims to
reach 255,000 families by 2014. With this increase, the proportion of extremely poor farmers within all families assisted by the FAP will rise from 41 percent to 57 percent. Currently, 156,000 farmers sell their output through this program.

To support these farmers, the federal government has guaranteed a team of 11
technicians for every thousand families. The plan also includes subsidies of R$ 2,400
every six months for families to support the production and marketing of surplus food.
This allowance will be granted for a maximum period of two years. Payment will be ensured through the Bolsa Familia card – a tool used by the Ministry of Social Development for distribute payments to families assisted by the national income transfer program, BolsaFamilia.

In addition, 253,000 households will receive seeds and other farming materials such as
fertilizers. Increasing the purchase of family farming products by publicand pivate
institutions such as hospitals, schools, universities, day care centers and prisons, is also a goal of the plan.

Access to water and electric power to be increased in rural and urban areas

Access to water for consumption and production will also be increased by “Brasil Sem
Miséria”. Under the new plan, the construction of new cisterns for farming and animal
husbandry will reach 600,000 rural households by 2013. Small properties will also be granted irrigation tools, as well as assistance for the recovery of wells.

By 2013, rainwater cisterns will be built to ensure access to water for the
consumption of 750,000 families. Since 2003, the government has allocated funds for the construction of 340,000 cisterns in the semiarid region. The deployment of complementary and collective supply systems to 272,000 households is another initiative to increase access to water. These various programs aim to reach both
dispersed rural populations as well as those living in more densely populated areas.

In addition, the plan aims to extent electricity to an additional 257,000 households
in Brazilby 2014. This figure is the result of IBGE data of the population living in
extreme poverty cross-referenced with information from the energy supply companies.

Green Grant: Quarterly grants of R$ 300 for environmental preservation

The federal government will create an income transfer program targeted specifically
for families in extreme poverty that promote environmental conservation in areas where
they live and work. The “Bolsa Verde”, or Green Grant, in the amount of R$ 300 will be
paid every quarter to families that preserve national forests, extractive reserves and
sustainable development areas. Grants will be transferred through the Bolsa Familia card.

Another 800,000 families and 1.3 million children will be added to Bolsa Familia program

Another key initiative of the national poverty alleviation plan will be to add 800,000 families who meet the requirements but haven’t yet been registered to Brazil’s
successful cash transfer program, Bolsa Familia. Proactive efforts will be made by the government to locate these potential beneficiaries, in order to complete their registration and achieve this goal by December 2013.

In addition, the government will increase the number of children and adolescents under age 15 that each family can file for benefits under the Bolsa Familia program. Currently, each family receives an additional R$ 32 per child each month, for a
maximum of three children. This limit is now increased to a maximum of 5 children per family, adding 1.3 million children and adolescents to the 15.7 million already benefiting from Bolsa Familia today. Among the extremely poor, 40 percent of the
children receiving assistance are under the age of 14. In April 2011, the government readjusted the amount of the benefit paid to children at this age by 45 percent.

In addition to expanding the reach of this national program, the federal government is currently negotiating with states and municipalities to adopt further and complementary cash transfer initiatives.

“Brasil Sem Miséria” will increase the provision of high quality public services

The expansion and increase in quality of public services offered to people in extreme
poverty is the basic mandate of the national poverty alleviation plan. In order to
maximize the impact of the program, “Brasil Sem Miséria” will increase and relocate programswith awareness, mobilization and training.

Key areas of focus will include:

Documentation and civil registration
Access to electricity
The fight against child labor
Community kitchens and food banks
Sanitation
Support for the homeless population
Nursery school and kindergarten
Household Health assistance program (Saúde da Família)
Maternal Health Assistance Network
Medication for hypertension and diabetes
Dental care
Ophthalmologicalassistance
The fight against crack cocaine and other drugs
Social assistance, through the CRAS Centres, as well as specialized centers (CREAS)

KEY FIGURES

Pull 16.2 million people out of extreme poverty

Target families whose household monthly income is up to R$ 70 per capita (US $45)

59% of the target audience is located in the Northeast, 47% live in rural areas; and 40% are under the age of 14

Training of 1.7 million people aged 18-65

Train and strengthen participation of 60,000 garbage pickers in recyclables collection programs by 2014

Provide infrastructure to 280,000 garbage pickers and strengthen 100 recyclable materials trade networks

Increase by four times the number of farmers in extreme poverty assisted by the Food Acquisition

Program (PAA), raising the number of assisted farmers to 255,000

Provide teams of 11 technicians for every thousand families of small farmers

Provide subsidies for family farmers of up to R$ 2,400 every six months per
family for two years to support the production and marketing of food surplus

253,000 family farming households will receive seeds and farming inputs

600,000 households to have rainwater cisterns for production

257,000 households to have access to electric power

Building rainwater cisterns for 750,000 families by the end of 2013

Implementation of complementary and collective water supply systems to 272 000 families

“Green Grant”: R$ 300 quarterly grants for families ensuring environmental preservation in their area of residence and work

BolsaFamilia income transfer program will reach additional 800,000 people

More than 1.3 million children and adolescents to be included in the Bolsa Familia cash transfer program

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New OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises

OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises.

Ministers from OECD and developing economies will today agree new guidelines to promote more responsible business conduct by multinational enterprises, and a second set of guidance to limit the use of conflict minerals.

Forty-two countries will commit to new, tougher standards of corporate behaviour in the updated Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises: the 34 OECD countries plus Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, Peru and Romania. The updated Guidelines include new recommendations on human rights abuse and company responsibility for their supply chains, making them the first inter-governmental agreement in this area.

The Guidelines establish that firms should respect human rights in every country in which they operate. Companies should also respect environmental and labour standards, for example, and have appropriate due diligence processes in place to ensure this happens. These include issues such as paying decent wages, combating bribe solicitation and extortion, and the promotion of sustainable consumption.

The Guidelines are a comprehensive, non-binding code of conduct that OECD member countries and others have agreed to promote among the business sector. A new, tougher process for complaints and mediation has also been put in place.

“The business community shares responsibility for restoring growth and trust in markets,” said OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría. “These guidelines will help the private sector grow their businesses responsibly by promoting human rights and boosting social development around the world.”

Ministers from adhering countries will also agree to a Recommendation designed to combat the illicit trade in minerals that finance armed conflict.

Illegal exploitation of natural resources in fragile African states has been fueling conflict across the region for decades. While data is scarce, it is estimated that up to 80% of minerals in some of the worst-affected zones may be smuggled out. The illegal trade stokes conflict, boosts crime and corruption, finances international terrorism and blocks economic and social development.

The Recommendation clarifies how companies can identify and better manage risks throughout the supply chain, from local exporters and mineral processors to the manufacturing and brand-name companies that use these minerals in their products.

The OECD and emerging economies worked closely with business, trade unions and non-governmental organisations to produce both sets of guidelines.

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Crowd Sourcing: How to be a good evaluator

Crowd Sourcing: How to be a good evaluator: Do This, Not That| weitzenegger.de.

How to be a good evaluator? (A new crowd sourcing exercise)

Results-based management in international development cooperation seems to require super heroes to evaluate it. How can you perform as a good evaluator and live on happily? Can you give us some practical advice from your experience? It will end up in a tip sheet for future evaluators.
Consider this:
1. What education, abilities, skills and experience are really needed?
2. How do you bring in your social and personal competencies (e.g., Social competence, Communication, Cooperative behaviour, Self-management, Team Management, Learning and problem solving)?
3. What does it take to meet the Standards (e.g., Independence, Stakeholder consultation and protection, Validity, Clarity, Fairness, Completeness, Transparency, and Timeliness)?
4. How do you prepare an assignment well (e.g., clarification, roles, stakeholder involvements, methodology, information and knowledge, logistics, time constraints, etc.)?
5. What behaviour is appropriate when evaluating (e.g., perspectives, techniques, self-awareness, respect, power-sharing, capacity building, give and take feedback)?
6. How do you master field work (e.g., stakeholder involvement, cultural competencies, diversity, credibility, presentation, transparent knowledge management)?
7. The day after: How do you follow-up after or in between evaluations?
8. What else are considered good practices as evaluator?
9. The Don’ts: What common mistakes should be avoided when evaluating?
10. What related guidance is already published elsewhere?

Please drop your ideas on this here as a comment.

Kind regards,
Karsten Weitzenegger

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European Report on Development: Social protection is key to poverty eradication

The second European Report on Development (ERD) was launched at the European Development Days in Brussels with the message that social protection needs to be
placed at the heart of EU development policy. ‘‘A number of African countries already
have social protection programmes in place. It is increasingly on the policy agenda of
African leaders and several EU donors already support social protection based on the belief that it is both a human right and a catalyst for promoting inclusive
development and pro-poor growth,” said Giorgia Giovannetti of the European University
Institute, the lead author of the report. ‘‘This year’s edition of the ERD concludes that these piecemeal efforts are not enough. Social protection needs to become a
central and coordinated component of the development policies of African countries, the EU and its Member States, and other donors. Our analysis shows that it is
feasible, affordable, and that the time is ripe”. The ERD is an initiative sponsored by the European Commission and seven EU Member States (Finland, France, Germany,
Luxembourg, Spain, Sweden and the UK). The research is conducted primarily at the
European University Institute in Florence. The first report, published in October 2009, focused on state fragility in sub-Saharan Africa.
http://erd.eui.eu/erd-2010/final-report/